UO hires Matthew Carmichael from UC-Davis as new Police Chief

8/31/2016: UO has successfully completed an open external search for police chief by hiring the guy who cleaned up the UC-Davis police department, after the tear-gassing incident that eventually led to the firing of Chancellor Katehi.

Matthew Carmichael,

… I am currently serving as the police chief at the University of California, Davis. I assumed leadership of our organization in 2011, a time when community/police relations was at an all-time low. In partnership with our community and those individuals that comprise the UC Davis Police Department family, I can now state with great confidence we have become a “Model Law Enforcement Agency”. The challenges we faced over the last five years have truly prepared me for taking on the role of police chief at a new organization such as the University of Oregon Police Department. …

3/5/2016: UO paid Chief McDermed 0.056 Gottfredsons to leave immediately

Betsy Hammond has the report in the Oregonian here. As usual it took a public records request to get the truth out of UO’s PR flacks, who’d been trying to spin this as a simple retirement:

University spokesman Tobin Klinger declined to say why McDermed’s bosses at UO wanted her gone so badly that they asked her to depart and agreed to pay the remaining four months of her contract in exchange for no work. Her total payout, $53,000, included two weeks of accrued vacation, he said.

Klinger disclosed the payment in response to a public records request from The Oregonian/OregonLive.

Both McDermed, 57, and Klinger characterized her departure as a retirement.

I’m wondering when we’re going to find out what role Doug Park played in the retaliatory Brady listing. Cleavenger’s attorneys claim on their website that Park and HLGR’s Andrea Coit were part of it:

Attorneys including Doug Park, University of Oregon’s Acting General Counsel, participated in the decision to “Brady List” Mr. Cleavenger. The University of Oregon was represented by Andrea Coit of Harrang Long Gary Rudnick P.C. in Eugene, who participated in the efforts to have Cleavenger “Brady Listed.” The decision to “Brady List” Cleavenger came immediately upon the heels of the decision by a neutral arbitrator that Cleavenger’s firing was improper and that he was entitled to reinstatement. The arbitrator further rejected all of the department’s accusations of dishonesty by Cleavenger. Despite the Arbitrator’s decision, UOPD tried to renew these claims of dishonesty by Cleavenger without providing the DA the Arbitrator’s actual decision, in a deliberate attempt to try to block Cleavenger’s reinstatement and in retaliation for Cleavenger filing his lawsuit.

Park didn’t get the promotion to permanent UO GC – but there are no budget constraints for JH insiders, so they let him keep the full salary anyway:

Screen Shot 2016-03-05 at 9.04.31 AM

2/29/2016: Deshpande to return to UOPD as Interim Chief, Le Duc to run search

Troy Shinn has the news in the ODE, here.

…. In the meantime, Andre Le Duc, Associate Vice President of Safety and Risk Services, will oversee the search with UOPD management to fill the position permanently. He has met and will continue to meet with UOPD staff this week about the transition. More information about the search for a new chief should come in the next few days.

2/27/2016: UOPD Chief Carolyn McDermed abruptly retires

Diane Dietz has the news in the RG, here:

Carolyn McDermed, eight-year head of the University of Oregon Police Department, left her post abruptly Friday.

Although university officials at the police and central communications office said they couldn’t comment on her departure late Friday afternoon, the UO Police Department put out a written statement at 10:39 p.m. Friday saying McDermed had “announced her retirement” on Friday.

“We will have information about the leadership transition process Monday, Feb. 29,” Kelly McIver, UO police communications director and public information officer, said in the written statement. …

Reporter Miles Trinidad has more in the Daily Emerald, here:

Carolyn McDermed, Chief of the UOPD, announced her retirement Friday, Feb. 26, according to an email from UOPD Communications Director Kelly McIver.

Andre LeDuc, Executive Director of Enterprise Risk Services, the department that oversees UOPD, sent an email to all UOPD employees at 9:34 p.m. on Friday announcing McDermed’s retirement. “Dear UOPD Colleagues,” the email read, “Carolyn McDermed, chief of the University of Oregon Police Department, announced her retirement today. We will have information about the leadership transition process Monday.”

Normal operations will continue throughout the weekend, McIver said.

McDermed’s retirement came with no warning. She had meetings scheduled for every day next week, including three days of Incident Command System advanced training and a meeting about Track Town 2016, McIver said only hours before McDermed announced her retirement.

McDermed has been under fire since the UOPD lost a $755,000 lawsuit last year. James Cleavenger, a former UOPD officer, sued three UOPD members, including McDermed. Cleavenger won the lawsuit, $36,000 of which was in punitive damages against McDermed herself.

I’m expecting that the UO administration will have a complete, credible explanation on Monday, and I won’t post comments until then. But if you have solid information on what’s going on, feel free to email me at uomatters at gmail.

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40 Responses to UO hires Matthew Carmichael from UC-Davis as new Police Chief

  1. Dog says:

    good

    Pete is a good guy and a fair, reasonable and intelligent person.

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  2. anonymous says:

    Deshpande — Desh! — emeritus physics professor — is going to run the UOPD? Great choice! Desh, we love you!

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    • uomatters says:

      In the end, everything is physics.

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      • Dog says:

        also in the beginning

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        • uomatters says:

          In the middle there’s some biology. Maybe followed by economics.

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          • Dog says:

            To paraphrase Lucretius (On the nature of things)

            In the beginning there were only random collisions in atoms

            Then came some supernova

            in the middle rises Art, Literature, Music, Philosophy and Science (economics is some random blip which is truly invented)

            In the end there are only random collision of atoms

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    • Fact Check says:

      You are thinking of Nilendra Deshpande.

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  3. Zigzag says:

    In with the new and out with the old. Hopefully this won’t be the only sudden “retirement” at UOPD because there are some other bad apples that need to be dealt with.

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  4. just different says:

    It looks like UO Matters didn’t post the O-live link.
    http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/03/university_of_oregon_paid_its.html

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  5. Anon says:

    And Lillis thinks the tenured faculty are the problem.

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  6. Zigzag says:

    They paid her to ‘retire’? What a farce. The administration should stop slapping their employees in the face with these nonsensical cover stories and would earn kudos and the respect of employees if they simply came out and said they fired someone. We’re all big boys and girls and can handle the truth. Stop trying to spoon feed us bullshit.

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    • uomatters says:

      Calling it a retirement doesn’t bother me so much as the years of mismanagement that Johnson Hall ignored, while they prattled on about “the safety of our students” being their primary concern.

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      • Kitten says:

        For my part, I’m sick of people keeping their “interim” salaries. Or keeping any of the salary bumps they get for a job they fail at. What do they pay the GC they hired? It must be substantially more than the rate Park is keeping for his term as interim. The rate of inflation in admin salaries is just mind-boggling.

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        • just different says:

          I’d like to know exactly what a “deputy” general counsel is since we managed to get along without one up until now.
          FWIW, deputy GC Park makes $204K. Reed makes $328K. All three assistant GC make over $110K, and associate GC Sam Hill makes $137K. So about $1.1M base pay for the lawyers. Didn’t check the support staff.

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          • Deputy Administrators for $500 says:

            What is “a fall guy”.

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  7. Epiphany says:

    Get a top admin position, do a terrible job, run good people into the ground, get paid a lot, get your employers sued for over a million, keep working, suddenly get “retired”, keep getting paid, and keep your PERS/IAP? It seems being inept pays better than doing a good job.

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  8. Worker Bee says:

    Sad to see Carolyn take the fall for this departments many issues, but there was and always has been a lack of leadership. Many other departments suffer the same issues. No leadership just overpaid chair warmers.

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  9. Let the games begin says:

    Take the fall? Sounds like she got what was long coming. I don’t see anything sad about getting rid of someone who allowed her staff to commit retaliation and did not appear to discipline a single person for the bowl of dicks list. But what does it matter? She still got paid. She gets to keep her retirement benefits. Looks like she won’t have to pay a cent of the nearly $2mil the school will now have to pay out because of her sub par leadership. Sounds to me like they she was fired. The school should never have to pay out when someone is fired. This just makes me sick that the school wants to make budget cuts but is willing to pay out the contract of someone who cost the school millions and damaged the reputation of the institute and the police department. This is unacceptable and serious change needs to happen. President Schill, are you listening at all?????

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  10. UO PD Out of Control Spending says:

    $160k for a police chief with 20 officers. That’s more than Eugene’s police chief made recently with 170. UO spending is completely out of control. What’s the total budget for the UO PD? I’m guessing like $3 million a year. Not too long ago, a half million to EPD provided all the policing really needed.

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    • uomatters says:

      True, but if UO didn’t have our own police, how would Duck Spokesperson Tobin Klinger be able to claim FERPA when asked about a football player assaulting a student? Surely you’re not saying $2.5M is too much to pay for that?

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    • History Dept says:

      Back when UOPD was still a glimmer in the UO’s eye, they made the VPFA parade around campus tailing the chief on an information campaign. They tried selling this boondoggle on the promise it would be cheaper and more efficient than the agreement they had with EPD. Every time, she couldn’t say it without laughing, even with her public game face on.

      In reality, the switch to UPOD was largely driven by athletics. UO really was paying out the nose for EPD to work security for games. Officers were getting paid overtime rates to direct traffic, deal with rowdy drunks, or just watch football from the sniper perches at Autzen. UO still pays quite a bit for other agencies to work the games, and also had to pay for new cars, uniforms, higher salaries, and the new station.

      The other way athletics drove the change was to protect athletes from scandals. Reports to EPD were winding up in the newspapers, players then had to be suspended, and games were being lost. UO even got EPD to write a fancy MOU that they wouldn’t tattle anymore when players got in trouble on campus.

      UOPD has certainly made the administration more efficient. Now at their whim they can send an officer directly over to a student to arrest them for recording a phone call, kick protesters off campus, or shoo the homeless somewhere else. To their credit, EPD didn’t have time for any of that petty nonsense.

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      • uomatters says:

        Yes, the history of the UOPD and before that UO Public Safety is a history of lies, corruption, incompetence, lawyers, guns and money. Lots of lies and money. Former VPFA Frances Dyke’s lies to the university and the state legislature about money were especially notable.

        I’d forgot about that MOU. It’s hard to keep track of it all, but I do my best, here: http://uomatters.com/tag/public-safety

        This RG Op-Ed is very good: http://projects.registerguard.com/rg/opinion/33197825-78/uo-police-need-independent-review-system.html.csp

        Will new Chief Matthew Carmichael be willing to accept the independent review board that the UOPD needs? Will his bosses? UC-Davis has a “Police Accountability Board”: http://pab.ucdavis.edu/

        INTRODUCTION
        Enclosed is the UC Davis Police Accountability Board’s (“PAB”) 2014-15 Annual Report.
        From May 2014 to June 2015, the PAB received fourteen (14) complaints and, consistent
        with the PAB’s procedures, closed six (6) complaints of police misconduct.
        MISSION OF THE PAB
        Pursuant to direction from Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, a Police Accountability Board
        (PAB) has been established whose purpose is to promote accountability, trust, and
        communication between the University of California, Davis (UCD) community and the
        UCD Police Department (UCDPD) by independently reviewing and making
        recommendations regarding investigations of complaints made by members of the
        campus community and the general public (also referred to as civilian complaints) in a
        fair and unbiased manner.
        HISTORY AND FUNCTIONS OF THE PAB
        After consultation with an independent expert in police oversight and several campus
        forums, the PAB was established as pilot project in May 2014. Developing a police
        accountability program for the UC Davis Police Department is one component of a
        complex process of evaluating, restructuring, and healing in response to the November
        18, 2011 UC Davis pepper spraying incident. The Reynoso Task Force and the RobinsonEdley
        Reports, commissioned as a result of this incident, provided the background and
        context which led to the recommendation of the establishment of a police accountability
        program for the UC Davis Police Department. It was established to restore trust between
        the police and the campus community.
        The PAB is an independent board composed of representatives from the UC Davis
        community. Working with independent campus investigators from the Office of
        Compliance and Policy, the PAB is charged with making recommended findings to the
        Chief of Police based on objective investigations into complaints of misconduct filed
        against UC Davis police officers. These recommendations are considered by the Chief of
        Police who may accept, reject or modify the PAB’s recommendation(s). The Chief may
        also take corrective actions based on these recommendations. The PAB also solicits public
        input during open meetings and may submit advisory recommendations to the Chief
        about UC Davis Police Department policies and procedures.

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  11. Big Cat says:

    Matthew Carmichael is the police chief who caused such an uproar at UC Davis over the pepper spray incident. That’s the best we can hire? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UC_Davis_pepper-spray_incident

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    • uomatters says:

      No, he’s not. Annette Spicuzza was the Police Chief during the pepper-spray incident. Matthew Carmichael was appointed interim chief then chief *after* the pepper-spray incident.

      That’s what the SacBee says:

      Carmichael became acting chief in November 2011 and was sworn in as interim chief the following April. He took over after then-Chief Annette Spicuzza was placed on administrative leave following the pepper-spraying of students that garnered nationwide attention. He was appointed to the permanent position in May 2014, following a nationwide search for a new chief.

      http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/crime/article99127387.html

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    • uomatters says:

      Again, Carmichael was *not* UC-Davis police chief during the pepper-spray incident.

      Andrew Theen in the Oregonian: http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/08/university_of_oregon_names_new.html

      Carmichael is no stranger to taking over departments after a period of unrest. He was first named interim chief of police at the University of California, Davis, in 2011 after that school made national headlines when a police officer nonchalantly pepper sprayed students who were part of the Occupy movement.

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  12. Frank Sorrentino says:

    Carmichael has a good reputation and has tremendous experience both in university policing and policing in a municipality. There’s still a bad apple or two at the UOPD (and I’m surprised no one has released any info yet), so hopefully he takes charge and does what’s necessary. Still, I would have loved to come back as the chief, and would have done it for 100 grand, tops. But, after speaking out against the corruption and incompetence, there was no way they’d even consider hiring me. Running a department that size is a piece of cake, as long as you have the gumption to do what’s right. Anyways, good luck to Carmichael….

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    • uomatters says:

      Thanks Frank, very good to hear from you on Carmichael.

      For those who are new to this, Sorrentino is a former UO Police Sergeant. He knows what he’s talking about. And he doesn’t just use the First Amendment, while at UO he protected everyone’s right to use it, and he taught the rest of the UOPD what it meant.

      Video of him in action here: http://uomatters.com/2016/01/former-uopd-sergeant-describes-chief-mcdermeds-mismanagement.html

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      • Keep it real says:

        He didn’t teach the rest of anyone what it meant, just two very junior officers. UOPD has some excellent people working there. Please don’t paint with such a broad brush. I’m sure I could find a story about an inept professor screwing up, but I wouldn’t say that’s what all professors are like. Credit where credit is due.

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        • Are You Kidding Me? says:

          Keep it real, the junior officers you refer to included one UO Law School grad. She knew what freedom of speach was and let her co-worker fail intentionally because she did not like him. Eugene is no doubt regretting the decision to hire that one from UOPD.

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  13. Anonymous says:

    There’s no doubt from reading the hiring materials that Chief Carmichael is qualified. But he’s leaving a $170K position for a reported $160K position in a smaller department in a crappier climate. If he was actually as successful at turning Davis around as he claims, wouldn’t he want to stay there and reap the benefits of his hard work?

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  14. Are You Kidding Me? says:

    What corruption and bad apples is Sorrentino referring to? The fact that the person who oversees the department prohibits a forensic audit even after it was pointed out that the checks have been computed wrong for years. Nothing to see here, just look elsewhere. Is it the sergeant who watches netflix and chews tobacco at work, against UO policy? Or is it that Deb Pack received a paycheck for not reporting to work for several months? Could it be the dispatch supervisor who yells at everyone and spreads false rumors about her workers such as rumors about their sex lives? Im pretty sure there is a term for that one! Bad apples or misfits?

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    • Frank Sorrentino says:

      Are u kidding me, the problems go much deeper than that. Some border on criminal…..

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  15. Being Real says:

    Carmichael will have a difficult time being micromanaged by the LeDuc. LeDuc has caused division within UOPD due to his lack of knowledge of law enforcement procedures. He has “difficulty with memory” on decisions he makes and talks about himself continuously. LeDuc should report to Carmichael if UO ever wants to move forward with a viable police department.

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  16. Being Real says:

    Good Luck to Chief Carmichael. He will have a difficult job dealing with a lazy, lying sleeping sergeant, a useless nincompoop for a security director, a dispatch manager who looks and acts like she is on drugs and a narcissistic Asst. VP who can only talk about himself and divide a police department in the process. Wake up President Schill. Keep that Narcissistic Assist. VP far from the police department. He should have never made it past GTF.

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    • Thom Aquinas says:

      Have an issue with Andre LeDuc much? He’s actually really good at what he’s doing. Personal experience.
      Maybe that division he caused is from starting to clean out those Augeas’ Stables also known as UOPD? Of course, that results in resentment from ‘some’. Are you on your way out, too, by any chance? On the ‘losing’ side? Good luck to you.

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  17. outforjustice says:

    So, spoken from an insider, here is one of the biggest challenges facing the uopd and the new chief: dealing with (or the refusal to deal with) a problem supervisor. We have a sergeant here that conducts himself in the following ways: Watches movies at work, especially when he was on night shift, and brags about it to other officers; Sleeps in the office; tells a female sergeant that she only has her job because she is a female (title IX, perhaps?); uses tobacco products, and tells subordinates that it’s ok for them to do it as well; has an oddly close relationship with a subordinate officer, and shows that officer favoritism; shops for and purchases a big-screen t.v. after the Olympic trials (while on duty),and gets seen doing so by another sergeant;as the professional standards lieutenant, illegally accesses HIS OWN background file, and the files of 2 other sergeants that would be competing with him for promotion (for non-law enforcement folks, that’s a BIG no-no); as the professional standards lieutenant, leaves the university repeatedly (in a company car) for hours at a time, with no accountability or reason;as the professional standards lieutenant, fails to generate any work or complete any assignment; and, gets sent back to patrol because he failed miserably as the acting professional standards lieutenant; and talk about having a big pair of nads, tells the university lawyers that he got cheated out of the chief’s position and lost out on money, and the spot should be handed to him! I guess we just have to forget the fact that he did not meet the minimum job qualifications… Oh, but in an attempt to negate all that, he volunteers to drive the new chief to the uniform supply shop in Kaiser, presumably so he can start sucking up to the new boss. After all we need to maintain the status quo around here, right? If this is the type of behavior that gets swept under the rug, how are we ever going to evolve into the police department that we can, and should, be?

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  18. GetReal says:

    Good at what? What is he doing? Personal experience or merely self reflection?

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