IAAF under attack as pressure grows on Lord Coe

The latest investigation of the IAAF’s doping problems is out. One of many stories here:

[Former IAAF President Lamine Diack] is firmly in the line of fire. The report also concluded he:

  • appeared to have created a close inner circle which functioned as “an informal illegitimate governance structure” outside the IAAF;
  • sanctioned and appeared to have had personal knowledge of the fraud and the extortion of athletes carried out by the actions of the illegitimate governance structure he put in place.

“Here it started with the president of the organisation. It involved the treasurer of the organisation. It involved the personal counsel of the president, acting on instructions of the president. It involved two of the sons of the president. It involved the director of the medical and anti-doping department of the IAAF. The corruption was embedded in the organisation. … Continued denial will simply make it more difficult to make genuine progress.”

At least one investigation of the 2019 and 2021 track championship bids is already underway. Meanwhile Track Town’s Vin Lananna and UO’s AVP for State Affairs Hans Bernard are currently lobbying the Oregon legislature to give $25M in state tax money to the corrupt IAAF, in exchange for their permission to let Eugene host their 2021 championships. Tax money will cover prizes and raft of perks for the IAAF leadership, including 5 star hotel rooms, etc. The IAAF keeps all the TV revenue.

IRS investigating Track Town? Lananna offers to spread IAAF pork

The IRS rumor is from a normally reliable source. I don’t know exactly what it’s about, and I assume that most of these investigations go nowhere, but fwiw Track Town’s recent 990 forms are here:

DOJ Track Town 990 2015DOJ Track Town 990 2014

The RG story by Diane Dietz is here:

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As expected, Lananna has trimmed $15M from his $40M legislative and is promising plenty o’ pork to spread around the state:

“Eastern Oregon,” Lananna said. “You’ll be surprised.”

Actually, Malheur Lake Wildlife Refuge looks like it would be a great training facility. Lananna’s other strategy is to put the fear of California in the legislators:

Big federations, such as Australia, the United Kingdom and Germany, will be in the market for an Oregon base of operations, and they’ll land at places such as Oregon State University, Willamette University, and any other entrepreneurial town that makes a pitch.

… It’s not too early for Oregon chambers of commerce and tourist bureaus to ready their appeals for the 2021 trade, he said. “If we don’t get on this right away, they’ll be staying in California and Washington,” Lananna said.

Then there are all the spillover benefits for Nike. Whoops, I forgot Nike can’t be mentioned, sorry, I mean for uh, Ninkasi. Yeah, right, that’s the big winner from the World Track and Field Championships – craft beer:

“Somebody from Switzerland comes into Eugene and is sitting in a pub and drinks a Ninkasi — and they start talking about this back in Switzerland. Now you’re no longer talking about a local craft beer; you’re talking about a potential global product. There’s many examples of that.”

Not to mention the $5M salary spillover for Lananna.

Seriously, it all sounds great. So why won’t the winners pay for it – and for Lananna – and make the academic side whole? Here’s what the famously corrupt IAAF wants us to pay for. Sorry, it’s a long list:

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For starters, free UO staff labor, while we keep those pesky seminars and academic classes off campus:

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And that’s on top of the IAAF’s other demands:

From the IAAF website, here. http://www.iaaf.org/eventbidding/iaaf-events/iaaf-world-championships:

The following are the main financial obligations of the organising committee:

The Local Organising Committee (LOC) is responsible for overall management of the event budget.

• Pay prize money for the IAAF World Championships (total amount USD 7.194 million);

• Pay travel and full-board accommodation costs for the quota athletes (approximately 2,000) for a maximum of 13 nights in a 4* hotel;

• Charge not more than USD 100, per person per night, for full-board accommodation in twin rooms for additional athletes and team officials for a maximum of 13 nights;

• Pay travel and full-board accommodation costs for the IAAF Competition Delegates (approximately 55 people) and in addition travel and full-board accommodation costs of the required site visits;

• Pay travel and full-board accommodation costs for one Congress Delegate per member federation for a maximum of 15 nights (approximately 212 people);

• Charge not more than USD 100 for bed & breakfast accommodation in single rooms for members of the IAAF Family accommodated in a 4* or 5* hotel;

• Pay any related cost for national competition officials;

• Pay full-board accommodation costs for the staff of the technology partner providing timing / chip timing services, a minimum of 58 people for a minimum of 18 nights and for 2 site visits by 2 people;

• Pay full-board accommodation costs for the staff of the technology partner providing results and information services, a minimum of 37 people for a minimum of 22 nights and 2 site visits by 2 people;

• Provide free of charge networking and internet connection following specifications of IAAF and its technology partners;

• Pay at least 50% of the costs of these services provided by a company appointed by IAAF (in the event the IAAF does not have a technology partner for the timing and/or results services);

• Pay for the provision of up to 800 Commentator Information System (CIS) terminals;

• Pay accommodation costs for the competition staff of Mondo, a minimum of 4 people for 15 nights;

• Provide free-of-charge the IAAF and Dentsu with equipped offices, including fast and secure internet connection in their respective hotels and in the stadium;

• Pay the costs of a first-class event presentation including the services of the IAAF event presentation team;

• Provide free-of-charge the IAAF and Dentsu with an agreed number of VVIP and VIP tickets in the main tribune, adequate hospitality for such ticket holders and an agreed number of parking passes;

• Pay USD 50,000 towards the development costs of the accreditation system and the full-board accommodation costs for the accreditation company team (approximately 10 people for approximately of 28 nights) as well as a contribution towards the cards (i.e., USD 2.50 per card issued). Cover any expenses for the shipped accreditation equipment to clear customs and contribute to a maximum of USD 1500. Cover 50% of the travel expenses of the accreditation company staff if the event is taking place outside of Europe. In addition, pay travel and full-board accommodation costs of the required site visits. Special requests from the LOC to the accreditation company will also be at the LOC’s expense;

• Pay the organisational costs of the IAAF Congress, including the provision of:

◦ the congress centre;

◦ the technical equipment (including facilities for simultaneous translation in six languages TV production, secure networking for offices and the voting system);

◦ the office equipment;

◦ the opening ceremony and official dinner;

• Pay the organisation costs for 2 Council Meetings during the time of the championships and one before – including the provision of:

◦ the council meeting room(s);

◦ the technical equipment (including facilities for simultaneous translation in three languages, networking);

◦ the office equipment;

◦ the official dinner;

• Pay the costs of the advertising boards, advertising material and related services for the national sponsors and 50% of the cost of the gantries for the non-stadia events;

• Pay for the painting of a blue line on the course of the non-stadia events, showing the shortest possible route;

• Pay the creation and registration of trademarks or brands as requested by the IAAF / Dentsu;

• Provide a free, live TV broadcast signal (as per specifications defined by IAAF) via a host broadcaster (non-rights holder in home country) to be proposed by the LOC;

• Provide free of charge working facilities including internet connection for TV commentators and media;

• Pay any tax that the host country’s government may levy on any prize money earned by the athletes;

• Pay any and all taxes in connection with the importation, exportation, transportation, installation and customs clearance of any VIK, premiums and promotional gift items of the commercial affiliates;

• Pay the costs for doping control organisation and implementation, including blood testing pre-competition (number of samples as requested by the IAAF) and approximately 500 competition urine tests and 150 EPO or other additional special analyses (e.g., IRMS) as requested by IAAF;

• Provide appropriate medical organisation (health care and sports medicine services), as per IAAF competition medical guidelines accessible on IAAF website;

• Pay for insurance policies as required by the IAAF, inclusive of operational activities of Dentsu and IAAF commercial partners;

• Pay for the production of the bibs in case the LOC is granted the rights to commercialise the bibs.

Lananna wraps up with a little of the charm that convinced Lamine Diack to sell the 2021 games to Track Town, for our money:

Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, has been publicly skeptical.

“Peter is spectacularly bright, passionate,” Lananna said. “He loves the state of Oregon. He has been supportive in the past. He’s got a lot of things that he has got to balance. I fully respect however he feels about this, and I’m hopeful and optimistic that he’ll see how good this can be for the state of Oregon.”

Lananna trips over 2021 IAAF championship tax/subsidy legislation

Jeff Manning has a long article explaining the current state of Track Town’s bid for the 2021 IAAF track championships, in the Oregonian here, I’ve posted a few snippets below.

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From the article:

Even before track and field’s international governing body was wracked by bribery and extortion allegations in November, Track Town USA’s bid for $40 million in state support was receiving a chilly reception from powerful state lawmakers. Track Town President Vin Lananna confirmed Thursday his group has pared back its agenda in the upcoming session and will seek only a lodging tax increase that is forecast to generate about $25 million for the World Championships.

While the Russians apparently paid IAAF President Lamine Diack and his son “Papa” only $1.8M to cover up drug testing results, Vin Lananna will earn about $5M by the time the IAAF championships are done. His money will come from UO, his own Track Town tax-exempt non-profit, and Nike. And it’s all legal. But of course he thinks Oregon will benefit even more than he will:

Lananna predicts the nine days of intense media attention will pay enormous dividends to Oregon’s hospitality industry. Just the “beauty shots” of Oregon alone — the short snippets of local scenery broadcasters will showcase — will raise the state’s profile with an international audience. Lananna even suggests a resulting surge in interest in running and track and field could make Oregon a healthier state.  He envisions an ambitious series of all-comer track meets catering to kids in particular to leverage off the big event.

“To get the World Championships is a great gift,” he said. “This can be a global platform for Oregon.”

A $25M tax increase for athletics is a “great gift”? Yeah, the gift that keeps on taking. Great:

Track Town also asked that the University of Oregon “accelerate construction” of new student dormitories to house the 2,000 competitors, that it find temporary housing for a media contingent expected to number 3,000 and to provide university facilities and staff for free or nominal costs.

Manning explains that Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney is less than enthusiastic, and Governor Kate Brown – who went to Monaco with Vin Lananna and the UO Foundation’s Paul Weinhold to promise $40m in state support to the IAAF and reiterated that as Governor, now doesn’t want to talk:

“I give you my personal commitment to apply all my powers and means to obtain the financial and legislative support in order to provide the funding necessary,” Brown wrote in a March 17, 2015, letter to the sport’s governing body.

But since the criminal investigation became public, Brown has remained low profile. Brown’s office now refuses to elaborate on what level of public funding she’ll support.

Who can blame her after last week’s Saul Hubbard story in the RG, which all but accused Kitzhaber of taking bribes to support the Track Town bid. State Rep Nancy Nathanson, who was supposed to write the subsidy bill, has now said that is off the table, and that if she sponsors anything “it will not be specific to helping only Track Town or the IAAF”.

Manning then goes on to ask if the UO’s administration should really be spending even more time and effort on sports, given our other problems:

The Chronicle of Higher Education on Sept. 14 ran an exhaustive piece about the UO entitled, “An Academic Reputation at Risk.” Noting the university’s chronic turnover — five presidents in six years — declining state support and “the outsized role of athletics,” the article said “Oregon often fails now to measure up to higher education’s heavy hitters.”

President Schill is a supporter of this, however:

In a long message emailed to all staffers Wednesday, Schill warned the university will proceed with a long-planned restructuring that will include some budget cuts. [UOM: Actually, cuts in some areas, increases in others.]

“Resources are too scarce and our mission too important for us to waste money in redundant administration, poorly performing programs, and lax accountability,” Schill wrote.

But the looming austerity drive does not diminish Schill’s enthusiastic support of the world championships or of UO sports in general. The international attention attracted by the world championships and the “minimal” costs to the university makes it an easy call, he said.

FWIW I’m all in favor of it too, if we can move that needle from costs to benefits, and if we really count all the costs. Including, for example, the time UO Foundation CEO Paul Weinhold has spent on this, and the time and credibility that UO’s chief state lobbyist Hans Bernard has used up on what has somehow, without any public discussion, become UO’s #3 legislative priority:

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From the December 3rd UO Board of Trustees meeting. The memo is here. This was not part of the public meeting materials, but was handed out only at the last minute. Which has sadly become the usual practice of Board Secretary Angela Wilhelms, when it comes to controversial materials.

Nike gave Kitzhaber $400K after he promised $40M subsidy to corrupt IAAF

Reporter Saul Hubbard of the Eugene Register Guard lays it all out in meticulous detail, here. You know it’s serious when VP for PR Kyle Henley sends the reporters to talk to serious people, instead of Tobin Klinger. Several UO Trustees also ponied up Kitz cash:

… Angela Wilhelms, secretary to the UO board, said, on behalf of the four trustees: “There is absolutely no correlation between personal political contributions by trustees and any decisions by Governor Kitzhaber.”

“Any insinuation of quid pro quo or any other connection is just flat wrong,” the statement said.

Well, that would be a little easier to believe if UO wasn’t stonewalling on the public records. It’s taken at least one public records order from Lane County DA Patty Perlow so far. But regardless, Hubbard has much more:

In recent weeks, TrackTown and Lananna have found themselves defending the IAAF’s April 2015 decision to award the 2021 championships to Eugene without a formal bidding process, after the IAAF awarded the 2019 event to Doha. French police are investigating alleged bribery in the IAAF, and the Eugene award itself. The revelation that Sebastian Coe, the new IAAF president, had been for years receiveing undisclosed annual payments of $150,000 from Nike, a potential conflict-of-interest, have sent shockwaves through the sport.

… On Oct. 30, the 42-day total of donations from Nike and its leaders and the four UO Trustees had reached $387,500 — roughly 8 percent of all Kitzhaber contributions during the 2013-14 election cycle.

By Nov. 14, Kitzhaber, who by then had won his re-election campaign, recorded his video message for the TrackTown bid presentation in Monaco.

In it, he used almost word-for-word the phrasing TrackTown had previously sent him. From his ceremonial Capitol office, Kitzhaber said: “I plan to support specific, bipartisan legislation that I believe will generate as much as $40 million to directly support the championships.”

It’s amazing what you can get for $400K these days. Here’s Kitzhaber promising $40M:

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Back it up to see new Oregon Governor Kate Brown in Monaco, introducing Kitzhaber and his pledge.

IAAF’s Seb Coe didn’t know Nike was helping with Hayward Field tart-up?

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Sara Germano has the latest wildly improbable claim from Lord Coe in the WSJ here:

Nike Inc. has pledged $13.5 million toward renovations of track and field facilities at the University of Oregon, part of an upgrade that would facilitate the venue’s hosting of the 2021 World Track & Field championships.

The world’s largest sportswear maker said it has granted the first of two installments of $6.75 million to the University of Oregon Foundation, a nonprofit organization overseeing renovations to the school’s Hayward Field.

… Jackie Brock-Doyle, a spokeswoman for IAAF President Sebastian Coe, said neither the IAAF nor Mr. Coe were aware that Nike was a leading source of private funding for the stadium project. She said the stadium renovation wasn’t considered part of Eugene’s bid.

Mr. Coe, a two-time Olympic champion runner for Great Britain, was vice president of the IAAF from 2007 until his appointment as president in September. He simultaneously had served as a consultant to Nike from 2013 until November 2015, when he resigned his role as a Nike ambassador.

So does this mean Vin Lananna and Hans Bernard are going to abandon their efforts to lobby the legislature into paying for this latest athletic circus? That would be good.

In other Coe news, he’s worried about how old his fans are getting. From the Guardian:

“My vision is to have a sport that attracts more young people. The average age of those watching track and field is 55. This is not sustainable,” Coe said.

“The key to making that vision a reality is creating a sport that people once more trust in. Athletics must be a sport that athletes, fans, sponsors, media and parents alike know is safe to compete in on a level playing field and one in which clean effort is rewarded and celebrated.”

More here:

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Oregon legislators back off subsidizing Lord Coe’s corrupt IAAF

1/4/2016: Rumor down at the faculty club is that the legislators are backing away from the IAAF only bill, and instead preparing to load it up with pork for the rest of the state too, in hopes of buying the necessary 3/5 majority.

12/31/2015: Olympic Decathlete Ashton Eaton to lobby legislature for sports subsidies

Why doesn’t UO’s AVP for State Affairs Hans Bernard spend his time doing his job lobbying for academic support for UO, and leave the jock stuff to the well-paid Vin Lananna and his crew? Bernard is even working on bringing Olympic decathlete Ashton Eaton to the capitol for the February media event, at which UO plans to unveil its $40M ask to the state legislature. Or is it the UO Foundation that’s going to make the ask? Or Track Town? It’s all very murky – fortunately a lot of reporters are now digging into it.

Apparently the IAAF’s “Lord Coe” won’t be able to make this event – Parliament still has a few questions for him – and the French police still have Lamine Diack’s passport. Maybe Coe could send his chief of staff and PR expert Nick Davies to represent him? Oh, right, that really didn’t look good, did it. Still, it’s not like Coe himself took money from the Russians. What? You’re kidding – Nike and the Russians both financed Coe’s campaign for the IAAF presidency?

And we’re supposed to believe that this shiny expensive distraction is not going to affect the legislature’s support for UO’s academic mission? To quote former Interim President Scott Coltrane, when he was finally told what Track Town was demanding from UO’s academic side in terms of free office and meeting space, new dorm rooms, and cancelled classes, Yikes!

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Work Plan: They seem to be behind on a lot of this, but Track Town has a brown bag with Governor Kate Brown and meetings with legislators coming up Jan 13-15:

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“More than a whiff of scandal” around IAAF bid

From an editorial in the Bend Bulletin over UO’s plan to hit up the legislature for more athletic subsidies, here:

… There’s also more than a whiff of scandal around the meet. The controversy centers on the no-bid award that gave Eugene the right to host the games. It involves Nike, Sebastian Coe, Vin Lananna of the private nonprofit Track Town USA and, naturally, money and influence. The French are investigating the award and the possibility of bribery or other irregularities.

Of course, it would be lovely to have the IAAF meet in Eugene. But Oregon has real financial problems, and neither a lodging tax increase nor the world’s largest track meet will change that. Lawmakers should just not do it.

EcoNorthwest says Eugene will get $80M economic impact from IAAF

Whoops, that’s what the Russian economists said Moscow would get from the 2013 IAAF championships:

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8 billion TV viewers? World population is 7 billion.

For Eugene, EcoNorthwest’s prediction is 600% higher – for a $568M “total output contribution” and the equivalent of 2,608 full-year job equivalents. All that from a 10 day-long track meet? [See footnote.]

Let’s generously assume that 1/2 these jobs are construction jobs that really are full-time, full-year, while the rest of the jobs are full-time hotel, restaurant, etc that last for 2 weeks. That would mean the prediction is for 13*1304 = 16,952 short-term customer service type jobs (or the equivalent in overtime for current employees). This is for an event with a max of 30,000 spectators. So the estimate is that this will create more than one full-time job for every two spectators for the duration of the event. That seems high. (And perhaps 1/3 of the spectators will be Eugene residents who won’t use hotels, and who will reduce their spending on other local events, restaurants, etc. to be able to afford the tickets).

And Track Town has apparently got UO to give it the right to shut down UO summer classes for a month. That and the high housing costs will chase off a lot of students, many for the whole summer. Lots of countervailing job and income losses there, all of which are ignored in the ECONorthwest consulting report that Track Town will use to lobby the legislature, here:

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For what it’s worth I’m all in favor of bringing this IAAF championship to Eugene – but not at any price.

 

Footnote: The 2,608 job number is measured in full-year job equivalents. The IMPLAN software breaks these job estimates out by full-time and part-time, but EcoNorthwest does not report that breakout in their draft report. It probably doesn’t matter much, at least according to this reference: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/national/technical/econ/data/?cid=nrcs143_009732

“The estimated change in economic activity should be assessed relative to overall economic activity. Results should be reasonable and be able to assist the audience understand the contribution of the conservation expenditures to overall economic activity. IMPLAN defines a “job year” as the amount of labor needed for one year’s work. Job estimates coming directly out of IMPLAN represent both full and part-time jobs. It is possible to convert to full time equivalent jobs using a FTE conversion table from the IMPLAN Web site; typical conversions have run between .90 and .92 FTEs for NRCS analyses.”

“Lord Coe” to visit Oregon, lobby Gov Brown and legislature for IAAF subsidies

Update: Diane Dietz reports Track Town’s Vin Lananna will ask the state to double the hotel tax, to pay the IAAF’s demands. In the RG here:

The forecast budget includes state tax dollars to pay for:

$7.2 million for prizes

$14 million to host the broadcast

$9 million for accommodations

$6 million for the festival outside the event gates

$4 million to add seating to Hayward Field

$5 million for security

The 2016 Oregon Legislature would have to approve the expenditure, and the governor would have to sign off, too.

UO pays Lananna $450K, Track Town pays him another $335K, and he gets another $30K or so direct from Nike, or so he told the NCAA. Actually he got a little confused about the difference between an amount and a percentage – but whatever, Rob Mullens signed off on it anyway:

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Fortunately UO’s got a strong Code of Ethics, which covers Lananna’s behavior.

12/29/2015: Or that was the plan in November:

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But given Seb Coe’s current problems,

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I’ll go out on limb and predict he’s not going to show for this January 13th meeting in Salem:

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NY Times calls for rebid on Lananna’s deal with IAAF for Eugene 2021

A long opinion piece, here:

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Reopening the bidding process would also allow further public scrutiny of Nike and its role in Eugene’s candidacy: welcome in light of the new I.A.A.F. president Sebastian Coe’s longstanding commercial ties to the company that he only recently severed; welcome, too, in light of Lananna’s connections even if Lananna says that Nike, based in nearby Beaverton, played no formal role in the bid.

Eriksson wants a full accounting of 2021, preferably from the French police. No evidence has surfaced publicly that Diack’s interest in and connection to Eugene was corrupt. But the process, even if it proves free of corruption, was flawed, and with Coe and the I.A.A.F. scrambling to institute internal reforms and external oversight, allowing a process like Eugene 2021 to stand seems badly out of tune with the times. Why clean house and skip a room?

It’s hard to see how a do-over can be avoided, if Seb Coe is going to keep claiming he’s trying to clean up the IAAF. And his future hangs on that claim.

Meanwhile Lananna still has not shown UO President Mike Schill what UO will be required to do and pay for, in exchange for the privilege of hosting these games.

A rebid means a public debate about what the games are really worth to the state, the university, Nike, and boosters like Lananna – and who should pay to get those benefits. The UO Board of Trustees, the UO Foundation, the UO Public Records Office, and former Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber have done everything they could to avoid having those questions addressed in public.

Register Guard reporter Diane Dietz has done everything she could to bring the hidden deals out into the open. My money is on Dietz and a rebid.

Yikes: Lananna still hasn’t shown Johnson Hall Track Town’s IAAF bid

That’s the word from UO’s Public Records Officer. She then graciously offers to get a copy from Track Town:

12/22/2015

Dear Mr. Harbaugh,

The University does not possess the bid book you requested, as TrackTown provided the bid book directly to the Register Guard. It is our understanding that Mr. Lananna did not prepare the bid book, and to the extent that he ever used that document it was in his capacity as a TrackTown employee (Mr. Lananna is employed by the University at a .69 FTE , and the remainder of his time is spent as a TrackTown employee.)  It is for this reason that UO never possessed a copy of the bid book.  The University has provided you with all the records Vin Lananna possessed in his UO e-mail and files that is in any way relate to the 2019 IAAF Championships.

That said, the office can contact TrackTown for a copy of the bid book, which we can then provide to you.   

Sincerely,

Lisa Thornton
Public Records Office
6207 University of Oregon

Now that’s a new level of transparency for UO. In my reply I thank her and suggest she might also want to send a copy to the Provost and President. Apparently Coltrane found out about the bid from a rumor down at the faculty club:

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Yikes:

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And give the jocks free labor while you keep those pesky seminars and academic classes off campus:

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12/21/2015: Below are some of the IAAF’s costs and perks for their entourage, which UO Director of State Relations Hans Bernard is going to ask the legislature to pay for in February. About $40M worth. Or will the UO Foundation pay? The claim is that this will not be a trade-off for money to support UO’s academic side. Sure it won’t:

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Here’s UO Foundation CEO Paul Weinhold pledging the Foundation will make good any shortfalls:

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Here’s Boston mayor bailing on Boston’s Olympic bid after reporters uncovered similar shenanigans:

“This is a commitment I cannot make without assurances that Boston and its residents will be protected,” Walsh said. “I refuse to mortgage the future of the city away. I refuse to put Boston on the hook for overruns. And I refuse to commit to signing a guarantee that uses taxpayer dollars to pay for the Olympics.”

http://www.usatoday.com/story/…

From the IAAF website, here. http://www.iaaf.org/eventbidding/iaaf-events/iaaf-world-championships:

The following are the main financial obligations of the organising committee:

The Local Organising Committee (LOC) is responsible for overall management of the event budget.

• Pay prize money for the IAAF World Championships (total amount USD 7.194 million);

• Pay travel and full-board accommodation costs for the quota athletes (approximately 2,000) for a maximum of 13 nights in a 4* hotel;

• Charge not more than USD 100, per person per night, for full-board accommodation in twin rooms for additional athletes and team officials for a maximum of 13 nights;

• Pay travel and full-board accommodation costs for the IAAF Competition Delegates (approximately 55 people) and in addition travel and full-board accommodation costs of the required site visits;

• Pay travel and full-board accommodation costs for one Congress Delegate per member federation for a maximum of 15 nights (approximately 212 people);

• Charge not more than USD 100 for bed & breakfast accommodation in single rooms for members of the IAAF Family accommodated in a 4* or 5* hotel;

• Pay any related cost for national competition officials;

• Pay full-board accommodation costs for the staff of the technology partner providing timing / chip timing services, a minimum of 58 people for a minimum of 18 nights and for 2 site visits by 2 people;

• Pay full-board accommodation costs for the staff of the technology partner providing results and information services, a minimum of 37 people for a minimum of 22 nights and 2 site visits by 2 people;

• Provide free of charge networking and internet connection following specifications of IAAF and its technology partners;

• Pay at least 50% of the costs of these services provided by a company appointed by IAAF (in the event the IAAF does not have a technology partner for the timing and/or results services);

• Pay for the provision of up to 800 Commentator Information System (CIS) terminals;

• Pay accommodation costs for the competition staff of Mondo, a minimum of 4 people for 15 nights;

• Provide free-of-charge the IAAF and Dentsu with equipped offices, including fast and secure internet connection in their respective hotels and in the stadium;

• Pay the costs of a first-class event presentation including the services of the IAAF event presentation team;

• Provide free-of-charge the IAAF and Dentsu with an agreed number of VVIP and VIP tickets in the main tribune, adequate hospitality for such ticket holders and an agreed number of parking passes;

• Pay USD 50,000 towards the development costs of the accreditation system and the full-board accommodation costs for the accreditation company team (approximately 10 people for approximately of 28 nights) as well as a contribution towards the cards (i.e., USD 2.50 per card issued). Cover any expenses for the shipped accreditation equipment to clear customs and contribute to a maximum of USD 1500. Cover 50% of the travel expenses of the accreditation company staff if the event is taking place outside of Europe. In addition, pay travel and full-board accommodation costs of the required site visits. Special requests from the LOC to the accreditation company will also be at the LOC’s expense;

• Pay the organisational costs of the IAAF Congress, including the provision of:

◦ the congress centre;

◦ the technical equipment (including facilities for simultaneous translation in six languages TV production, secure networking for offices and the voting system);

◦ the office equipment;

◦ the opening ceremony and official dinner;

• Pay the organisation costs for 2 Council Meetings during the time of the championships and one before – including the provision of:

◦ the council meeting room(s);

◦ the technical equipment (including facilities for simultaneous translation in three languages, networking);

◦ the office equipment;

◦ the official dinner;

• Pay the costs of the advertising boards, advertising material and related services for the national sponsors and 50% of the cost of the gantries for the non-stadia events;

• Pay for the painting of a blue line on the course of the non-stadia events, showing the shortest possible route;

• Pay the creation and registration of trademarks or brands as requested by the IAAF / Dentsu;

• Provide a free, live TV broadcast signal (as per specifications defined by IAAF) via a host broadcaster (non-rights holder in home country) to be proposed by the LOC;

• Provide free of charge working facilities including internet connection for TV commentators and media;

• Pay any tax that the host country’s government may levy on any prize money earned by the athletes;

• Pay any and all taxes in connection with the importation, exportation, transportation, installation and customs clearance of any VIK, premiums and promotional gift items of the commercial affiliates;

• Pay the costs for doping control organisation and implementation, including blood testing pre-competition (number of samples as requested by the IAAF) and approximately 500 competition urine tests and 150 EPO or other additional special analyses (e.g., IRMS) as requested by IAAF;

• Provide appropriate medical organisation (health care and sports medicine services), as per IAAF competition medical guidelines accessible on IAAF website;

• Pay for insurance policies as required by the IAAF, inclusive of operational activities of Dentsu and IAAF commercial partners;

• Pay for the production of the bibs in case the LOC is granted the rights to commercialise the bibs.

Bidding summary

Frequency Duration Athletes/ officials Bidding Timelines Candidatures
Open Deadline Decision
Every odd year 9 days 3200 5 years prior 4.5 years prior 4.5 years prior

This information is intended to provide future organisers with general guidelines on the main requirements for the organisation of the event and is subject to change.

IAAF’s Seb Coe throws new chief of staff Nick Davies under the bus

12/22/2015 update: I guess this means the defamation lawsuit is off:

Screen Shot 2015-12-22 at 11.40.10 AM

12/21/2015: Gormless “Lord Coe” threatens reporter with defamation lawsuit

No, it’s not about Diane Dietz:

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This is apparently not Bird and Bird’s first attempt to shut up Seppelt – the last try was a miserable failure too. No telling why Coe didn’t hire noted defamation lawyer William F. Gary:

Screen Shot 2015-12-22 at 12.44.02 AM

This case is starting to get interesting. The BBC has the scoop on what Coe is trying to hide, here:

Screen Shot 2015-12-22 at 12.40.10 AM

 

Diane Dietz’s RG reports blow the Track Town / IAAF scandal wide open

Online at the Register Guard tonight, and in print tomorrow. There’s no way to adequately summarize this, read it all here. Vin Lananna’s take is  ~$800K a year, from 2012 to at least 2021. Lananna also owns a private media company that will be in on the championships. And while Lananna is making bank on this deal, he wants UO to give the IAAF everything at no charge – and cancel classes:

TrackTown USA is asking the UO to cancel all other activities during the championships — including orientations, seminars, camps or classes.

… “Participating teams will be lodged in University of Oregon housing, all of which will be brand new or renovated prior to” the event, according to the bid book. The UO has said it is borrowing money to finance the construction.

TrackTown USA also has plans to use the Knight Law building, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Matthew Knight Arena — all, Lananna asks, at minimal charge.

Hayward Field would be upgraded with triple the seating, including a new main grandstand featuring 300 linear feet of flexible suite space for corporate hospitality and event operations, according to the bid. The work will be privately funded, according to the UO. [I thought Hans Bernard was asking the state to pay for this.]

TrackTown USA is asking for the use of various physical spaces at no charge, including classrooms, meeting rooms, lecture halls, lounges, outdoor spaces and the university’s 6,100 parking spaces, according to UO documents.

TrackTown USA will require help from UO employees in catering, housing, IT and network services, the UO Police Department, Enterprise Risk Services, plus employees from academic departments, including athletics, architecture, business, international affairs, journalism, human physiology and the Global Studies Institute.

Any regular University of Oregon staff time spent working on the event would not be charged to Track Town USA,” according to UO documents.

Dietz has everything, except maybe a quote from Vladimir Putin. If she doesn’t get a Pulitzer there is no justice. But she’s got more. Way more:

http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/33843964-75/email-released-by-university-of-oregon-sparked-french-probe.html.csp

An email released by the University of Oregon in October caused French prosecutors to open an investigation into how TrackTown USA won the bid to host the 2021 World Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Eugene.

The email showed a connection between Nike executive Craig Masback and International ­Association of Athletics Federations President Sebastian Coe, who also was on the Nike payroll at the time.

http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/33804692-75/lananna-ties-to-nike-phil-knight-have-grown-ever-tighter.html.csp

2007: Craig Masback, CEO of the nonprofit USA Track & Field, announces Eugene will get the 2012 U.S. Olympic Track & Field Trials, of which Nike is the sponsor. One month later, Masback quits the national track group to take an executive position at Nike.

http://registerguard.com/rg/news/local/33736651-75/lananna-draws-paychecks-from-multiple-public-and-private-sources.html.csp

Who pays Vin Lananna?

The University of Oregon? TrackTown USA? Phil Knight? Nike Inc.?

The answer appears to be: All of the above.

Since Lananna is a two-thirds-time public employee who also works fulltime as president of a non-profit corporation, the public can know a lot about how much he is paid each year for these two jobs: $769,105.

That’s $434,105 from the UO and $335,000 from TrackTown USA, according to the latest figures.

He also gets $30,000 a year straight from Beaverton-based Nike for “endorsement or consultation” work, according to a disclosure form he filed with the UO.

And, of course, free parking at the Jock Box.

IAAF money man Paul Weinhold not part of Lananna’s team for RG meeting

That’s the word from the RG’s Austin Meek, here:

Lananna and his team — TrackTown treasurer Michael Reilly, UO general counsel Kevin Reed and athletic director Rob Mullens — took a step in that direction by meeting face-to-face with a group of reporters and editors at The Register-Guard last week. The meeting was cordial and professional, but no one was holding hands.

Well, they’re going to need a scapegoat. Apparently the RG will have more news soon.

Here’s Weinhold telling IAAF President Lamine Diack that if they give Lananna’s Track Town group the championships, the UO Foundation will make good any losses:

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IAAF’s Lamine Diack admits he asked for €1.5M bribe

The Manchester Guardian has the news here:

The former IAAF president Lamine Diack has admitted to police that he asked Russia for €1.5m to run a political campaign in his native Senegal, according to the French newspaper Le Monde.

France’s national office for financial prosecutions is investigating Diack, who stepped down as IAAF president in August when he was succeeded by Sebastian Coe.

Police say he is suspected of taking the money to cover up positive drugs tests by Russian athletes.

Le Monde says it has obtained transcripts of Diack’s interviews with police in which he admits to having spoken with the former Russian athletics federation president and IAAF treasurer Valentin Balakhnichev about needing money. Diack wanted to finance opposition against Senegal’s then-president Abdoulaye Wade.

Diack and friends, in happier times:

http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2015/dec/18/former-iaaf-president-russia-political-campaign-lamine-diack