University & Nike agree on $252M contract, includes academic scholarships

That would be The Ohio State University & Nike. Details in the WSJ here:

Nike Inc. has agreed to a $252 million deal with Ohio State University to extend its existing sponsorship by 15 years, escalating an arms race among sportswear makers and top sports schools.

Ohio State will receive $112 million in product from Nike and at least $103 million in cash, including royalty income, according to terms of the contract reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

The agreement, most of which will take effect with the 2018-2019 season, includes more than $41 million in commitments beyond the Buckeyes’ athletic department to include scholarships and internships for non-athletes at Ohio State.

So, roughly $6.5M a year in cash per year, much of it for the academic side.

In comparison, Nike’s contract with the University of Oregon pays $600K per year. I think the Ducks spend it all on themselves. Matthew Kish has more in the Portland Business Journal, here and here.

But hey, we’re #1 in “discretionary apparel”! From what I can tell from Dave Hubin’s redacted public records, $30K of that clothing allowance goes to our colleagues in Johnson Hall, presumably including some who signed off on the contract:

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4 Responses to University & Nike agree on $252M contract, includes academic scholarships

  1. Anas clypeata says:

    I thought that Oregon’s ethics laws for public employees forbade accepting gifts of over $50 per year. How do the UO admins redacted above get around that provision?

    ORS 244.025: https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/lawsstatutes/2013ors244.html

  2. Eugenenative says:

    Nike and Mr Knight don’t care about UO academics. They are still nursing a grudge from the WRC dispute back in the last century. They apparently have long memories.

  3. daffy Duck says:

    this may not be a popular view, but here goes. one can certainly argue that Knights relative interest in academics and athletics is skewed, but his being the second largest donor to academics in UO history does not square with not caring about academics.

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