Frohnmayer’s 2009-2010 Teaching Schedule:


From what we can tell, this is UO President Emeritus Dave Frohnmayer’s entire 2009-2010 teaching load – two 10 week long, 25 student classes, co-taught with Barbara West, for Winter quarter only. For this he will be paid $245,000, and we pay another $25,000 or so for Ms West. (And still more for a secretary. And a GTF. And $186,000 for “supplies and expenses.)

Now, you naive new assistant professors might be asking where does an underfunded school like UO get $270,000 to pay 2 people to teach 50 students for 10 weeks? (Dave was on sabbatical for half the year, at full pay. Normal load for the rest of the year would therefore be 2 to 2.5 courses – not 1). I’m no economist, but here’s the math: The average student pays $1,000 or so a course. 50 students gets you $50,000 – so UO still has a $220,000 nut to make payday for these two.

No worries, we will assign you to teach a 250 student lecture course, filling up, say, 180 PLC. That’s $250,000 for UO. Take out $30,000 for prorated pay for you and your 3 GTFs, and you’ve just brought in enough to pay off our President Emeritus for this year. But wait – what about his benefits? No problem – you’ve still got a few more classes to teach.

And Dave is so grateful for your contribution – maybe he’ll even use you as an example of how “Advanced Leadership” works. Oh wait, here’s another idea – let’s cut pay for the university staff! Then we’ll have enough to redecorate Dave’s 2 new offices too: From the SEIU email:

Tier 1: Monthly base rate – $2,450 & below: Monthly Pay Reduction 2.051%
Tier 2 Monthly base rate – $2,451 to $3,105: Monthly Pay Reduction 3.077%
Tier 3 Monthly base rate $3,106 to $5,733: Monthly Pay Reduction 3.590%
Tier 4 Monthly base rate – $5,734 and above: Monthly Pay Reduction 4.103%

See? There’s really nothing to this leadership stuff – you just take whatever the fuck you can get away with.

Update: When he was selling this furlough program to the faculty and the staff, Frohnmayer said he would participate himself. He did – for about 3 months, and only with the part of his salary paid by the state, which was less than 50%. As soon as people stopped watching, he went back to taking his full salary.

Frohnmayer joins law firm

9/17/2009: Times are tough for UO faculty, what with salaries stuck at 80% of those at Missouri. Lots of us are looking around for something on the side, to make ends meet. Apparently former Pres Frohnmayer is now in the same boat. And his golden parachute contract – which pays $245,700 for co-teaching two 25 student classes – leaves Dave with a little more free time than most of us have. So, he’s now got a side gig working part time for Oregon law firm Harrang Long etc. (sic).

Dave does promise to follow UO COC rules – unlike VP Martinez. (But whoops – it seems Dave forgot to tell the reporter about his other second job as an Umpqua Bank Director, at $40,000 per year for about 20 days work. Proxy statement here.)

From today’s RG story by Sherri Buri McDonald. Kudos to her for asking some tough questions.

Former University of Oregon President Dave Frohnmayer has taken a job with the Eugene-based law firm of Harrang Long Gary Rudnick. As of Tuesday, Frohnmayer became “of counsel” to the firm, accepting select projects in legal, public policy and other matters,

Frohnmayer said he has joined the UO faculty and is on paid sabbatical leave through the end of the year, which will probably result in him writing a book or articles. While on sabbatical, he’ll develop the undergraduate leadership courses he will teach next year in the university’s Clark Honors College
….
Frohnmayer said his work for Harrang Long will be limited and comply with the “conflicts of interest” and “conflicts of commitment” rules that all university faculty must observe.

While Frohnmayer goes to work for Harrang Long, he remains a highly paid state employee. Under that contract, he is now on paid sabbatical through the end of the year, at $4,725 a week. From Jan. 1 through March 31, he will continue to be paid that salary while he teaches the undergraduate course at the Clark Honors College, according to the contract. Then, he will go on “study leave” through May 30, during which the UO will pay him $4,252 a week, according to the contract. … He said he plans to use his study leave to continue to study leadership theory.

Leadership theory? You are joking with us, right Dave? Very funny.

How rare is Frohnmayer’s sweet retirement deal?

8/14/2009: We’ve reported before on Frohnmayer’s amazing retirement contract. The OUS board created a new position for him, called “President Emeritus”. He keeps his $245,000 base salary plus whatever the Foundation gives him to top it off, (currently $50K as Knight chair) plus a secretary and a GTF, plus a full salary 1/2 year sabbatical, plus a 90% salary 2 month “study leave”, plus offices in the HC and the law school, plus expenses including travel. In return he agrees to teach one 20 person class per year. Furthermore, when he decides to really retire, UO still won’t be done shelling out the bucks – he will be eligible for the same golden parachute contract that he gave to his former Provost, John Moseley.

Frohnmayer’s retirement package is unusually generous even in the sycophantic world of university boards and administrators. For example, Insidehighered.com has a story on a renegotiation of the retirement contract for retired NC State Chancellor (President) James Oblinger. He was originally allowed to keep his Chancellor’s salary for 6 months, before going back to a regular faculty member’s pay (and duties!). If we read Dave’s contract correctly, his deal is good for as long as he wants it. I’m guessing that will be a really, really long time. Page one says “Further, at all times, Frohnmayer shall enjoy the privileges associated with serving as a tenured professor at the University of Oregon School of Law.” But the contract says absolutely nothing about any of the responsibilities. He can teach a class in the law school someday – if he chooses to do so.

Board Cuts Pay of Ex-Chancellor of N.C. State:

The board of the University of North Carolina System voted on Friday to immediately cut the pay of James Oblinger, the former chancellor of North Carolina State University, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. Oblinger resigned in June under an agreement in which he was promised to be paid his chancellor’s salary ($420,000) for six months, before returning to the faculty, where he would be paid as a professor. The board, amid some disagreement but facing statewide criticism over the exit packages given to administrators, voted to cut Oblinger immediately to $173,000, which is what he will earn as a professor of food science. Oblinger quit amid an escalating public debate over his university hiring the wife of the then-governor. As he quit, Oblinger stated that he did not believe he had done anything improper, but wanted the university to focus on other issues.

Oh yeah – who was NC State’s Dean when they hired the then-governor’s wife for $170,000? Linda Brady, who then left to become UO Provost.

Frohnmayer’s golden parachute

7/8/2009: Frohnmayer’s Retirement Contract. He keeps his $245,000 base salary plus whatever the Foundation gives him to top it off, (unknown as of yet, but he know gets around $50K as Knight chair) plus a secretary and a GTF, plus a full salary 1/2 year sabbatical, plus a 90% salary 2 month “study leave”, plus offices in the HC and the law school, plus expenses including travel.

In return he agrees to teach one 20 person class per year – and that with GTF support?

UO will never be able to do enough for this man – and you can count on him to make sure of that.

A Modest Proposal

7/7/2009: From this Greg Bolt story in the RG today – apparently Frohnmayer is still being paid as if he were President, with the assignment of “brainstorming about how to increase the numbers of Oregonians who get college degrees.”

Frohnmayer will be paid a pro-rated portion of the state share of his salary as university president, or about $28,000 for the six-week appointment. The state paid Frohnmayer $245,700 in salary in his final year plus a retirement payment in addition to supplements from the UO Foundation that boosted his total pay to about $650,000, not including the value of a state-supplied home and a vehicle allowance.

How about giving the money back Dave – that’s enough to pay in state tuition for one student, for 4 years! Or at least you could agree to take one of those voluntary furloughs you’ve been pushing faculty to sign up for.

RG Editorial on salaries

6/15/2009: The RG has an editorial today on low faculty salaries at UO – repeating the now infamous $7,300 less than Missouri number, and making enough other comparisons to head off the counter-arguments and excuses we’ve been hearing from President Frohnmayer and UO’s administrators on this. The RG then argues – or maybe this is my explication – that the current high unemployment rate shows that the state should diversify its economic base, that higher education is a proven way to do that, and that low faculty salaries are not going to make it easy to build UO back into the strong research university the state needs.

As always the question is how to come up with the money to do this. It will take about $10 million per year to get salaries up near peer levels. UO has this money already – thanks to higher tuition and enrollment. This site tries to document how the current administration has been spending that money on their own salaries (120% of peers), perks ($3 million on remodeling!) and a raft of pet projects that distract from our core academic mission. If incoming President Lariviere is serious about rebuilding UO, he is going to have to start by making some tough decisions about the millions of dollars that UO has been spending on increased administrative salaries and expenses, subsidizing Bend, new programs in Portland, diversity, sustainability and so on. Tough choices. The sooner he starts, the sooner the rebuilding will start.

I hope that editorials like this will make Lariviere’s decisions on these issues easier. They will be opposed by many special interests, including President Frohnmayer. Unfortunately Frohnmayer has chosen to forego the traditional year long off campus sabbatical for retiring presidents. The reason for this tradition is to ensure that the old president will not meddle in the decisions of the new one. It is a bad sign that Frohnmayer did not do this voluntarily, and a worse one that Lariviere did not have enough influence with the OUS board to insist on it.

The Daily Emerald has been doing good reporting about UO politics again. So far it hasn’t risen to the standard of Ryan Knutson’s Bernsteinian investigative pieces on the arena, but reporter Alex Tomchak Scott seems to know how to do an interview. See this story on the UO Senate’s version of Florida 2000. (Not in story: the Senate minutes show there was no quorum at the meeting that elected van Donkelaar either!) Check out Frohnmayer’s quotes on Tublitz – I hope Scott brought a handkerchief to wipe off the spittle:

“If anything,” Frohnmayer said, “I’ve made efforts to revitalize the Senate. If (demoralizing the Senate has) occurred, it’s occurred because of many other demands on faculty members’ time, and because frankly some people have attempted to use the Senate for their own personal agendas, including a couple that I’ve named, and that drives people away. But I don’t think it’s my doing at all. I really don’t. I’ve a clean conscience and an uninhibited mind on this.”

5/19/2009:

This letter in the Daily Emerald from an apparently well-informed student provides firm evidence that President Frohnmayer will soon have to give up on the Autzen “O” effort – he is just struggling not to withdraw from his position prematurely.

At the 4/14 furlough meeting President Frohnmayer and Provost Bean said that UO’s administrative expense ratio was 38% of peers, Bend was “in the black”, and that the Portland projects have not cost the Eugene campus. We’ve recently heard that the OUS Board has now asked Provost Bean to provide his data in support of these claims. His remarks at the 5/13 Senate meeting were a first (unsuccessful) attempt regarding the admin expense issue, and we’ve been told more will be forthcoming on Moseley and Bend, and on UO-Portland. We’re not sure what has prompted this sudden change in heart at the OUS Board. Perhaps someone (not us!) filed a DOJ complaint about the Furlough meeting. Perhaps Lariviere has told Bean to clean up this mess before he arrives. Perhaps the Board members have finally gotten more aggressive now that their old friend Frohnmayer has checked out. We’ll see.

Bullies

5/15/2009:

“So the bullies have won.” The Register Guard Editors. The RG takes UO President Dave Frohnmayer to task for failing to defend Professor Sohlberg from the mob that was incited by this RG story on the O sign. The RG Editors can’t bring themselves to criticize Dave by name, but still this is a new and relatively courageous step for them. His contempt for the faculty has been obvious for years and is now part of the DNA of his administration and the athletic department. But his refusal to issue a strong public defense of Sohlberg’s basic right to “peacefully petition for redress” goes far beyond his usual pettiness. Still, now that the sign can stay, we’re sure he will issue a florid public statement of some sort.