Latest doings of the NCAA cartel

Here’s an interesting speech from the NCAA Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby [sic]: http://newsok.com/bowlsby-gets-serious-with-cheating-pays-pronouncement/article/5011747

“Enforcement is broken,” said Bowlsby, one of the most respected men in collegiate sports. “The infractions committee hasn’t had a hearing in almost a year, and I think it’s not an understatement to say that cheating pays presently. If you seek to conspire to certainly bend the rules, you can do it successfully and probably not get caught in most occasions.”

By “cheating”, the NCAA infractions committee, which UO’s Faculty Athletics Representative Jim O’Fallon (Law) sits on, generally means trying to compensate athletes in violation of the cartel’s rules. For example, if a booster gives a player’s mother money to come to a game, or pays for medical care, or a player tries to sell their own autograph, they make the player pay a fine and/or hound him out of college sports. College athletics money is for the coaches, not the players! So it’s good news the infractions committee isn’t doing much.

And there’s some more good news for the players on the O’Bannon lawsuit: http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/college/2014/07/23/ncaa-lawsuit-ea-sports-video-games-proposed-settlement/13074005/ At least I think it’s good news, I’m no sports law expert like UO’s Rob Illig (Law).

And finally, a piece in the Atlantic from civil rights historian Taylor Branch, on the recent congressional hearings on the NCAA and the dim prospects for internal reform. Elevator version: university presidents don’t have the stones to even try: http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/07/the-ncaa-tells-congress-its-going-to-reform-itself/374948/

Student records, FERPA, and football

6/24/2013: UO is trying to charge UO’s student journalists $240 for a copy of his official calendar, claiming that student names are protected under FERPA as “student records” and they have to pay for Lisa Thornton to go through it and redact them. I’m guessing it’s about 10 names. But there seems to be no problem with UO’s athletics department going along with this detailed story on the academic problems of a football recruit. I wonder what sort of privacy release they make those guys sign!