AAD Eric Roedl’s football ticket revenue is falling, so he wants to squeeze the students

11/21/2019: I’m sitting at the meeting in the EMU now – four athletic department administrators and several very skeptical ASUO students.

Here’s the data for revenue from tickets sold to non-students. It’s fallen by about $4M in 5 years.  So he’s trying to increase what students have to pay to athletics from the mandatory student i-fee.

2014:

2019:

On the cost driver side, Roedl’s salary was about $225K in 2016. Up 18% in 3 years:

11/19/2019: UO students just not that into Duck football, even at $0.00 a ticket

ASUO – UO’s student government – pays Rob Mullens’s Athletic Department about $2M a year for student tickets, which they then distribute “for free” to students. They get the money from a mandatory fee they charge all students every term. A previous post about how Assoc Athletic Director Eric Roedl runs this shakedown operation is here.

But apparently $0.00 is too high a price. As this photo of the student section from the interesting fan blog GoDucks.net shows, our students don’t really care much about big-time college sports:

 

Remember the Hat Day: November 21, 2011

11/21/2019: Your periodic reminder that UO Board of Trustee Chair Chuck Lillis has yet to deliver on the promise that an independent UO Board would benefit UO’s academic mission and our students. Apparently this is the fault of the faculty union, PERS, and of course China. I’m sure he’ll give more excuses at the next BoT meeting, Dec 9-10.

8/15/2019:  Former UO President Richard Lariviere has just announced that he will retire from his job as Pres of Chicago’s Field Museum next year after completing what seems to have been a successful rescue mission, if you’re into dinosaurs.

If you are interested in public higher education and what happened during Lariviere’s brief two years at UO, you should start by reading this article from Brent Walth in the Oregon Quarterly, about why he came to UO. The Around the O link is broken, but here’s the gist:

Lariviere recalls having dinner one night with two major UO supporters, who were then trying to woo him to accept the University’s presidency. Lariviere says he was intrigued about coming to the UO but was not yet convinced. At one point, one of the donors turned to the other and asked, “Shall we talk to him about the freedom movement?”

Lariviere perked up. His dinner companions told him the UO’s current relationship with the State of Oregon—the very relationship that spawned and fostered the University for more than a century—was a wreck. The state’s repeated cuts to Oregon’s public higher-education system and the UO in particular had gone so far that the University might as well be private. Lariviere says he told his hosts he didn’t want to take the UO private. They told him they wanted to keep the UO public but find a way to bring it the financial stability it now lacked. “That,” Lariviere says, “was something I could get behind.”

 … The plan has already run into opposition in the legislature. That’s not surprising, given that the plan—at its core—is about power. Lariviere’s plan would give the University more power than it’s ever had to control its own fate. Under his plan, the UO would be overseen by its own board, appointed by the governor. The board would have final say over major UO decisions, such as hiring top officials, its budget, and setting tuition.

This did not work out well.

2018: Is UO better off now than it was in 2011? Better off than if Kitzhaber hadn’t fired Lariviere? Better off with our independent Board of Trustees? I don’t know. The Board has not delivered yet.

I do know that I continue to be amazed and inspired by how then Senate President Rob Kyr and the faculty, students, and UO supporters handled Lariviere’s firing and the subsequent chaos.

2017:  I think nostalgia for Lariviere peaked under Mike Gottfredson, and has fallen to historical lows under Mike Schill. Here’s the post from 2015, with a few updates:

2011:

Break out your hats and mark the day. On November 21st 2011, three four five six years and four five UO presidents ago, OUS Chancellor George Pernsteiner and Board Chair Matt Donegan came down to UO with their ultimatum and told Lariviere to resign, for trying to implement his “New Partnership” plan to combine $1B in state bonds and $800M in private donations to create a sustainable funding model for UO, run by an independent UO Board. The endowment income would have, in theory, produced enough income to more than replace the state’s annual appropriations, and have allowed UO to keep in-state tuition low.

He also ignored the governor’s call for a pay freeze, and passed out a round of secret raises to faculty and staff. Lariviere refused to leave, so they fired him, on instructions from Governor Kitzhaber. Nigel Jaquiss broke the news on the 22nd.

Six years later, where are the principals in this sad event?

UO President Richard Lariviere: Now president of Chicago’s Field Museum, and apparently well on his way to completing a turnaround of that troubled institution.

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Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber: Resigned after getting caught trying to destroy his email archives, and found guilty of violations of Oregon ethics law.

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OUS Chancellor George Pernsteiner: Still living at Treetops and using Oregon students’ tuition money to pay for his kids’ maid service. Just kidding, the croissant chancellor went on to a $300K sinecure as president of SHEEO, a little known non-profit higher ed policy group in Colorado. He’s now retired from that, and is on the board at Bridgeport, a scandal ridden for-profit university system.

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OUS Board Chair Matt Donegan: After a very nasty divorce he sold his timber business, then sent out some feelers on restarting his political career. The response was not good, and he’s dropped out of public life to work on counting his money.

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(Bridget Burns and Chuck Triplett at the 2011 Mac Court meeting.)

OUS Board Secretary Chuck Triplett: Triplett’s role in setting up the secret discussions that led to the board’s decision to fire Lariviere may never be fully known, unless I can get my hands on the OUS digital email archives. Meanwhile he has parlayed his $72K job for Pernsteiner into a $130K job for UO, and then a promotion from Scott Coltrane. All without an affirmative action compliant search. He’s currently JH liason to the UO Senate – an appointment made without consulting the Senate with which he is supposed to liase. He’s currently UO liason to the HECC, the putative replacement to OUS.

Pernsteiner’s Chief of Staff Bridget Burns: She and Triplett were quite the team. After OUS collapsed she set up a consulting business, which just got a $9.8M grant from the DoE. According to her website,

… she led the successful legislative effort to free Oregon’€™s seven universities from state agency status, for which she received the national award for innovation in government relations from colleagues spanning the national higher education landscape at AASCU, APLU, AACC, and CASE.

Wow, and to think Mark Haas and Mike Gottfredson have been claiming all the credit for SB 270.

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UO Senate President, Protector and Defender of the University, Slayer of Chancellors, and Professor of Music Robert Kyr: “Mr. Pernsteiner, answer the question as a human being would answer it.”

Kyr is now back at his regular job, composing and teaching music theory.

No correlation between UO grad program rank and full professor pay

11/20/2019 repost: These are old data, but I doubt they’ve changed much.

8/9/2015: My understanding is that UO administration bargainer Bill Brady has said that the reason full professor pay for some UO departments lags the AAU averages is that some UO departments just aren’t that good. So I got curious if there was a correlation between UO department quality and pay.

The horizontal axis is the National Research Council’s 2010 ranking of UO PhD programs, see below for methodology. The vertical axis is average pay for UO full professors by department as a percentage of average pay at AAU publics for 2014-15. From UO IR, here.

I’m no econometrician, but the slope coefficient looks like zero to me. And lets not talk about the variance. There’s probably better data for department rankings but I doubt it changes the conclusion much: whatever system the UO administration is using to set faculty pay, it’s not about quality.

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The National Research Council rankings were released in 2010, the data was from 2007. Quoting from a description of the methodology here, “The NRC used 20 variables that it considers “indicators of program quality.” Variables include measures of faculty research activity, student support and outcomes, and faculty and student demographics. The indicators come from the extensive data provided by the institutions themselves as well as some data collected by the NRC (e.g., faculty awards, publications, and citations).” US News has more recent rankings for departments, but in contrast to their data driven undergrad rankings, the grad rankings are crap – entirely reputational, and the survey has simplistic questions and very low response rates. UO has current data on productivity from Academic Analytics by department (and faculty member) for ourselves and comparators, but the UO administration has chosen to keep even the UO department data secret. Maybe the administration’s bargaining team will show it at Wednesday’s bargaining session though, in an effort to justify their low-ball raise proposal?

9/29/2010: Idiots guide to NRC rankings of graduate programs:

Continue reading

Michael Schill and Jean Michel Basquiat at Faculty Club this week

Dear Colleagues,

The Faculty Club [go through the doors of the Art Museum and turn right] is open during the usual hours this week, Wednesday and Thursday from 5:00 to 8:00.

Right upstairs from the Faculty Club, in the galleries of the JSMA, are some great short-term loans that will only be up a few weeks more.  Since the galleries are open late on Wednesdays, why not pair a visit to the Faculty Club with a visit to Jean Michel Basquiat’s “Untitled,” a dramatic 8-foot canvas by the graffiti-inspired shooting star of the 1980’s art world.  But no heroin overdoses for you—the Faculty Club only serves beer, cider, wine, liquor and equally attractive non-alcoholic beverages.

Then Thursday evening UO president Michael Schill will be there to give the six-o-clock toast and to chat with all who would like to show up.  If you’d like to get a word in with the president, or just see what makes him tick, come on down!

We hope to see you one or both nights this week, and remind you that next week we’ll be closed for Thanksgiving Recess.

Yours, James Harper, Chair of the Faculty Club Board

President Schill takes responsibility for UO’s fragile finances

Just kidding, he’s blaming the unions. From Daily Emerald reporter Jack Forrest, here:

The somber mood was retained throughout much of the address with discussions of budget deficits and low financial reserves. At one point, Schill said some blame lies with UO’s trend to unionize.

“One of the things that produced our fragility is that we, unlike virtually all of our peer schools, tend to heavily unionize, in the faculty as well as in the staff,” Schill said. “It just means we lack some of the flexibility, some of the tools, some of the levers that other universities have. Maybe it’s worth it to have that, that’s a decision that the faculty made, but it does create that situation.”

The video is here. Rumor has it that the faculty union’s treasurer will be sending Schill an invoice for “scapegoat services”.

UO to teach Republican faculty how to write OpEds on their ideals

At least I assume that’s who this workshop is for, since they’re the most under-represented group on campus. But I doubt they’re going to find 21 Republicans to fill the class among UO’s ~1600 faculty, so maybe I’m missing something:

On February 22 and 23, 2020, the Clark Honors College, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Division of Equity and Inclusion are co-sponsoring a two-day workshop, called “Write to Change the World.” In this interactive workshop participants will explore ideas and sources of credibility; learn how to present ideas quickly and powerfully under pressure; understand when and why people change their minds; reflect on the difference between being “right” and being effective; and develop strategies for greater impact, including how to escape being pigeonholed and how to preach beyond the choir. The workshop also includes a pedagogical component, so that participants can incorporate this important part of public writing into their courses. Participants will leave with an outline of an op-ed in hand, plus three months’ access to OpEd Project journalist mentors for individual follow-up.

Recognizing that journalism is improved when a diversity of perspectives are included in public discourse, the OpEd Project and its UO partners seek to focus on the ideas and impact of underrepresented voices, including women, in order to share knowledge, resources and connections across color, creed, class, sexuality, gender and beyond.

Each of the co-sponsors will send seven participants to the workshop. Faculty members can submit applications to only one of the co-sponsors.

TTF faculty and career instructors may submit applications to the College of Arts and Sciences. Applications should include the following:

    1. A letter of application (no more than 500 words), describing how this workshop relates to your teaching and research, and how you will focus on the ideas and impact of underrepresented voices
    2. A description of the project you intend to work on during the workshop (no more than 250 words)
    3. A current CV.

Please send applications to: casdean@uoregon.eduApplications are due December 15, 2019. Applicants will be notified no later than January 15, 2020.

VPRI David Conover to retire, open national search for replacement

Dear University of Oregon Colleagues,

We are writing to let you know that David Conover is retiring from his role as vice president for research and innovation at the end of the academic year, effective July 3, 2020. David has served the university with distinction and been instrumental in promoting interdisciplinary research excellence and innovation in every corner of campus. He has determined that now is the right time for him to step down to wrap up some important research he has developed over his long and distinguished career. Upon retirement, he will hold the title of emeritus professor in the Department of Biology.

The Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation (OVPRI) supports the university’s research centers and essential core facilities, encourages innovation and economic development through strategic partnering and technology transfer initiatives, and helps identify ways to support our efforts as a top-tier research institution. The office oversees and coordinates the UO’s research proposal submissions, compliance, and contract and grant administration.

David has provided leadership around research opportunities across the university with a steady hand, an eye toward problem-solving, tenacity, and an earnest wit. He helped develop OVPRI’s new strategic plan, reduced administrative bottlenecks, and improved the ways the university uses data to benchmark and evaluate our research success.

David joined the university in 2016 and in the nearly four years of his tenure, the UO’s research and development expenditures grew almost 20 percent. For fiscal year 2018-19, the value of new research awards increased 70 percent, and federal research expenditures were up 9.6 percent. David and his team have done a great job in supporting these achievements in part by encouraging and incentivizing faculty to apply for more and larger grants.

We are committed to seeing that activity and trajectory continue under the next leader of OVPRI. We will launch an open, national search in the coming months for a new vice president to support the great work and research occurring across the campus and leverage the momentum of the last few years. We hope to be able to have the role filled prior to David’s departure next summer. Going forward, we will consult with David, his office, and campus stakeholders on next steps and will provide more information as a search plan is developed.

Please join us in thanking David for all he has done to serve the University of Oregon. We are happy that he will remain a friend and partner to the university in the capacity of emeritus professor.

Sincerely,
Michael H. Schill
President and Professor of Law
Patrick Phillips
Provost and Senior Vice President

Pres Schill and Kevin Reed continue work to weaken shared governance

Long story. Back in 2012 Interim UO President Bob Berdahl commissioned this memo from then General Counsel Randy Geller, on how he could disband the UO Senate and ensure its former committees were staffed with his lackeys. Snippets:

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This abolitionist effort failed. President Schill has adopted a more indirect, long term approach to weakening the Senate and shared governance.

Here’s the latest example. Last year, as Senate President I appointed a faculty member to the Campus Planning Committee who was skeptical of President Schill’s plans to develop the North Campus. The CPC has no real power, it just makes recommendations. You’d think there’d be no problem having a skeptic on it. Some might welcome one.

Not President Schill, whose response to this appointment was to unleash the full force of his office against it. He had his Liaison to the Senate Melanie Muenzer, devote hours of her time, staff time, summer law student intern time, and Senate Leadership time to argue that the President appointed the faculty members of the CPC, not the Senate. Now he’s got his General Counsel Kevin Reed to issue this 5 page memo, with a 20 page appendix, supporting his effort to control who makes recommendations to him and the campus about campus planning:

Full doc here.

Uh, 12-1 Nov 22 is *an* office hour, not “office hours”

One of the criticisms of the appointment and then reappointment of Ed school Prof Laura Lee McIntyre as the faculty trustee was that she didn’t know much about CAS – and the Board had specifically said the trustee replacing Law Prof Susan Gary should be from CAS. Around the O reports on McIntyre’s efforts to learn something about the rest of the university:

Board of trustees office hours scheduled for fall term 2019

Faculty trustee Laura Lee McIntyre will hold office hours for faculty colleagues Friday, Nov. 22, from noon to 1 p.m. in the Erb Memorial Union’s Owyhee Room. McIntyre is a professor and head of the Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences.

Senate for Wed: Schill’s State of U + Neuroscience, Diverse Heritage

Liveblog: State of the University updates from Pres Schill:

4-year graduation rate is up from about 50% to about 60. Budget situation is not good because of PERS and our heavily unionized environment. [And the failures of our board He’s going to work with Senate on a new policy for hiring academic administrators. He believes in trust and transparency. UO needs new degrees to keep up with our peers.

Senate Meeting Agenda – November 13, 2019

Location: EMU 145 & 146 (Crater Lake rooms)
3:00 – 5:00 P.M.

3:00 P.M.   Call to Order

  • Introductory Remarks; Senate President Elizabeth Skowron
  • Remarks; Senate Vice President Elliot Berkman

3:10 P.M.  Approval of the Minutes

3:15 P.M.   State of the University

  • President Schill
  • Tim Gardner, Knight Campus

3:30 P.M.   New Business

  • Election: Tenured faculty senator to serve on Senate Budget Committee: Nomination (Gina Biancarosa, COE)
  • Vote: US19/20-06: Motion re: UOCC rep to Graduate Council-voting status; Frances White (Anthropology)
  • Vote: US19/20-05: New Program Proposal: Bachelor’s in Neuroscience; Nicole Dudukovic (Psychology), Phil Washbourne (Biology), Hal Sadofsky (Divisional Dean Natural Sciences)
  • Update: Data Science undergraduate program proposal; Joe Sventek (Computer & Information Science) Bill Cresko (Dir Data Science Initiatives)

4:30 P.M.    Open Discussion

  • Committee on Recognizing our Diverse History: Updates (10’) and discussion (20’, time permitting)

4:50 P.M.   Reports
4:51 P.M.   Notice(s) of Motion
4:55 P.M.   Other Business
5:00 P.M.   Adjourn

Presidents Trump & Schill disagree over who is most transparent

It’s a tough call, really:

President Trump, 11/11/2019:

President Schill, 10/10/2019:

I can say, without a doubt, that the UO is the most transparent of them all. It’s not even close. The amount of data and information that we make available is truly extraordinary. …  I am planning to launch a transparency website this term, an online clearinghouse where we consolidate many of the publicly available reports and data about the university into one online location. … I look forward to sharing it with you in the coming weeks …

10/10/2019: Pres Schill thinks UO is transparent & your comments are disgusting

Also, while he continues to let his GC Kevin Reed use fees and delays to hide public records, he’s spending tuition money on an overscripted buddy movie of himself and Provost Phillips,

and on a “transparency website” that will post the information he wants you to see in easily digestible form. Please forgive my cynicism:

Dear University of Oregon colleagues,

A few weeks ago, UO’s new Provost Patrick Phillips and I took a walk around campus and talked about some of the things we are both looking forward to at the start of a new academic year. I would like to try something new—a hybrid edition of Open Mike featuring both video and text. I hope you will indulge me and take a few minutes to watch our discussion.

As we walked across campus, one topic we kept coming back to was our shared goal of helping to build a campus culture at UO that is grounded in both academic freedom and respectful dialogue. Some believe those two ideals are in conflict, but I do not see it that way. For example, Patrick and I do not always agree—and that is a good thing—because we make better decisions for the institution when we are challenging each other’s assumptions, playing devil’s advocate, and pushing the other to consider flaws in logic or to confront personal biases. The thing I most appreciate, though, is that we have the highest level of respect for each other and know that the conversation, even if heated, is rooted in wanting the best for the UO’s future, respecting our mission, and valuing students, faculty, and staff.

Our conversation got me thinking about the principles that should ultimately bind an academic institution and community of scholars. I firmly believe the UO is a community united by a desire to serve our current students and future generations. We strive for truth and understanding, and it is only through cooperation and teamwork that we can succeed, whether in the laboratory or the classroom. It is this spirit of cooperation and the sense of a higher calling to work toward the betterment of society through our mission of research, education, and service that makes us different, that generates the special spirit that is needed for us to succeed at the highest level. Our actions should model the behavior we hope will rub off on our students.

Quite honestly, I am not sure that we at the UO have always lived up to that ideal. Our campus culture can sometimes show cracks from the voices of cynicism and discord. But I recognize that I cannot expect those who seek a culture that values both academic freedom and respect to raise their voices if I do not set the right example from Johnson Hall. For that reason, I am establishing some principles that I will personally adhere to and that I will insist all members of my administration follow in a sincere effort to maintain and improve our campus culture. I invite colleagues across campus to do the same. Here are the principles I commit myself and the other administrators to:

Honesty. I, and the people who report to me, will never knowingly lie or mislead members of our community. Trust is an essential element of any well-functioning community and honesty is the foundation of trust. Unfortunately, the university I joined in 2015 was suffering from a severe lack of trust for reasons we all understand. I have tried my best to engender trust over the past four years, but I have not been as successful as I would have hoped. I continue to looks for ways to redouble my efforts here. But trust is a two-way street. We must all call out the bad behavior of some members of our community whose main purpose is to spread falsehoods for the purpose of sowing doubt and cynicism or achieving strategic advantage. A healthy dose of skepticism is good, but character assassination and the spreading of lies and innuendo is not.

Transparency. Trust can only be built through transparency. I sometimes wonder why some folks always think the administration is hiding things. I have been a faculty member at two universities and a faculty member/administrator at three others. I can say, without a doubt, that the UO is the most transparent of them all. It’s not even close. The amount of data and information that we make available is truly extraordinary. I sometimes think that the sheer volume of information on our institutional research and budget websites might hinder members of our community from finding what they are looking for. To deal with this issue, I am planning to launch a transparency website this term, an online clearinghouse where we consolidate many of the publicly available reports and data about the university into one online location. In addition, I hope to provide facts to answer some commonly held questions and clear up some persistent myths about the university. I look forward to sharing it with you in the coming weeks and, once it is live, I invite input from all of you on how we can improve it and make the tool more useful. Stay tuned.

Respect. As I stated above, one of the defining features of a successful academic community is respect. Respect for each other’s views and for our colleagues as people. Respect does not mean that we need to agree with each other; quite to the contrary. Vigorous disagreement about ideas is the hallmark of a healthy academic community. But ad hominin attacks, aspersions about motives, insults directed at colleagues, and harassment of co-workers are all signs of a dysfunctional community. We can do better here. I am disgusted by what I sometimes read online and in the comments section of local newspapers and blogs. We are better than this. If we are not, we need to be. We are faced with enough bad behavior online and in Washington, D.C.; we do not need to bring it into our university. I pledge I will do my best to treat everyone here with respect, whether in my office, in the classroom, or just walking across campus. I hope that respect will be mutual.

Grace. One of the defining elements of a well-functioning community is empathy, kindness, and, for want of a better word, grace. Over the past four years I have met thousands of our staff members, graduate students, faculty members, and administrators. I have talked to you and believe that the vast majority of our faculty and staff care deeply about our students and their futures. That is why you are here. You forgive them their mistakes and understand that life is about learning from our experiences—both good and bad. I wish that we could show each other that same grace. I have made and will make some mistakes as your president. So will other administrators. And so will you. But let’s not turn every mistake into a moment of attack. Let’s treat each other with some of the same grace we show our students. I promise I will try to do that as I fulfill my obligations as your president.

So, as we begin a new academic year, one that could have its share of tension and disagreement, I will employ these principles of honesty, transparency, respect, and grace. I will also try, to the best I am able, to throw in a bit of wisdom and humor from time to time.

Welcome back. I very much look forward to working closely with each of you this year.
Michael H. Schill
President and Professor of Law

Prof Jennifer Freyd’s work gets influential citation – from South Park

While UO’s lawyer Paula Barran – acting as the agent of President Schill and the Board of Trustees – has argued it’s OK to pay Freyd less because she doesn’t use bodily fluids or “sophisticated brain imaging” in her research, it appears that her ideas have a power of their own.

DARVO is the acronym she coined to explain a common way for bullies to respond to accusations of wrongdoing – as explained in the latest South Park episode:

Thanks to reader Dogmatic Ratios for the link. 39K views last I looked. How should this citation get weighted in Brad Shelton’s faculty metrics and merit pay increases?