NYT asks if PAC-12 cares about heath and safety

We all know they’re going to restart their program to give their unpaid “student-athletes” brain damage so people like Rob Mullens and Mario Cristobal can continue to cash in. This is about whether or not they’ll do so soon enough to also infect their students, families, and thousands in their communities with a deadly virus. Apparently this is a tough call for their governing board, which is chaired by UO Pres Schill:

Thanks to an anonymous reader for the link.

What passes for good news these days

Update: Count the number of seconds between lighting and thunder and divide by 5 to get distance in miles.

Live updates: Rain expected to suppress Oregon fires, could bring landslides, flooding and lightning to region

OPB (112.5K Twitter followers | 417,345 unique visitors per month): Josh Roering, professor of earth sciences at the University of Oregon, provides expert commentary.

Update: On, the other hand, there’s this:

Lamine Diack, who “gave” the 2021 (2022?) IAAF championships to Eugene, sentenced to 2 years

Diack in happier times, listening to UO Foundation head Paul Weinhold promise him the full faith and credit of UO’s $1B endowment, in exchange for a track meet:

Screen Shot 2015-12-19 at 11.33.15 PM

Today’s news from the BBC, here. Diack took money from Russian athletes to ignore their positive drug tests. His Treasurer was also convicted. Diack’s deputy, Lord Coe, who was on the Nike payroll and swore he knew nothing, is now in charge and has rebranded the IAAF as “World Athletics”.

Diack’s lawyers will appeal, but who knows what secrets a man might spill to get an early release from a French penitentiary?

GC Kevin Reed’s anti-free-speech work cited in law review article

The Nebraska Law Review, here. Always good to see a Johnson Hall administrator helping out with UO’s research metrics:

Reed also told me, during a public meeting of the UO Senate Executive Committee regarding his efforts to restrict free speech by students protesting the university foundation’s (money losing) investments in CO2 emitting industries, that he thought it might be a good idea if they faced the threat of jail time for their non-violent protests.

BOT meets

Materials here – updated yesterday with rudimentary data on athletics and auxiliary unit budgets. I’m not sure I have the stomach to watch much of this, but I’ll try and check in now and then.

Board Chair Lillis is having internet problems, as usual.

Board of Trustees September 10, 2020 | 8:30 a.m. PT

  1. ASUO President and University Senate President Reports. Isaiah Boyd, ASUO President; Elliot Berkman, Professor of Psychology and University Senate President

Berkman ran for Senate President on a platform of increasing the Senate’s participation in UO’s budget setting process. Judging from his obsequious remarks to the board, his recent email to the Senate, and the truncated meeting schedule, he’s abandoned that idea in favor of sucking up to the BOT and building his resume for a future administrative job. From his remarks:

“We learned to work together last year during President Skowron’s tenure and the spirit of shared governance through faculty administration collaboration that she nurtured has only grown since then. We’ve developed mutual trust and have identified shared goals in each of the priority areas for the Senate’s work this year.”

Meanwhile, the Senate website – which Berkman had announced he would redo last year – will not even show who is on the Senate, or its committees:

2. President and Provost Reports. Michael Schill, President; Patrick Phillips, Provost and Senior Vice President

Usual platitudes from both. Phillips is excited about the new Senate collaborators. Phillips attempts to defend his appointment by fiat of Carol Stabile as interim HC Dean – and announces he doesn’t intend to start a search for a permanent dean any time soon.

3. COVID-19 Impacts, Planning and Operations. Andre Le Duc, Associate Vice President and Chief Resilience Officer

“Moving toward capability for saliva testing by mid October”

Le Duc does a great job explaining why UO is not going to test students’ shit.

Murray asks GC Reed about potential Covid legal liabilities. Reed successfully evades.

4. University Finances. Jamie Moffitt, Vice President for Finance and Administration and CFO

With the help of the pandemic, VP Moffitt has managed to decrease the E&G fund deficit by $3.3M over Q3 projections:

First column is what the Board authorized for this year, at the end of last:

So, bottom line, even with Covid UO’s deficit was less than what the board authorized before Covid.

Some projections, FWIW. Trustee asks about enrollment. No reliable estimates yet. Schill is pessimistic given our reliance on out-of-state students (and the huge tuition increase this year from the tuition guarantee scheme.)

Moffitt expects to not trigger pay-cuts for fall.

Thompson on enrollment: Admits are up 5%. Sign-ups for summer Duck Days were up, but were of course cancelled. Worried that the problems at the schools that started early will hurt us. Believes that first year enrollment will be at bottom of the range above, but that overall enrollment will be flat. (!)

Schill: Significant drop in enrollment after we went on-line. Thompson: Yes. Expect about 300 requests to defer enrollment for “gap-year”.

Trustee & Moffitt: These numbers are challenging but manageable. Schill: Unless we get a big state funding cut.

[57 people watching on youtube now.]

It appears that at least one of the Trustees asked Moffitt to breakout the projections for the auxiliary budgets – at the bottom of the pdf. It’s grim. Housing deposits down 25%, could get worse:

Thompson notes that housing started with very large reserves (omitted from these data) so he’s not as worried as you might think.

Even worse for athletics – fortunately they still have about $65M in the reserve account Mullens was supposed to be saving to pay off the Knight Arena bonds, which he and the coaches can use to pay themselves millions while laying off the SEIU staff.

Mullens: We did a 10% pay cut for all staff including coaches (but still paid them bonuses) laid-off a lot of lower-paid classified staff, and made the government pay for furloughs for other.

Moffitt: We’re doing everything possible to not use E&G funds to cover these losses. We’ve even talked to the Foundation about helping athletics still more. [Odd that there’s no mention of the Foundation helping the academic side.]

Q about handling the deficit. Moffitt: No liquidity problems. Sitting on a lot of cash. But we do need to worry about deficits. Borrowed a lot of money to pay for Athletic Village, (as tax-exempt revenue bonds!) but need to pay those back.

Q about how much Athletics has actually saved from cost-cutting to date. Mullens: I don’t have those exact numbers. Q: What’s the Legacy Fund balance? Mullens: I think $60M, I think we spent about $7M on debt per year. Moffitt: Legacy fund is restricted to use for funding arena debt. [But of course money’s fungible, and in practice this money goes to salaries, etc.]

[Taking a break, not sure if I’ll be back live-blogging.]

5. Student Crisis Funds. Kris Winter, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students; Jim Brooks, Associate Vice President and Director of Financial Aid

Meeting Recessed Until 1:00 p.m. PT

6. Student Mental Health and Services. Deb Beck, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director of University Health Services; Shelly Kerr, Director of the University Counseling Center; Kris Winter, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students

7. Student Success Initiatives Semi-Annual Report. Yvette Alex-Assensoh, Vice President for Equity and Inclusion; Sung-Woo Cho, Research Associate Professor, College of Education; Doneka Scott, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Student Success

8. UOPD Budget and Operations. Matt Carmichael, Chief of Police

Wow – actual data on the increases in the UOPD budget – although it doesn’t go back far enough to show how much the decision to convert to sworn armed officers has cost:

9. Presidential Evaluation Summary Report. Chuck Lillis, Chair

Meeting Adjourned

Board of Trustees to meet Thursday

Plague, fighting in the streets, the sky is burning, football players threatening to strike, staff layoffs, faculty and OA pay cuts, our contagious students are coming back en masse, and to top it off the quarterly meeting of UO’s Board of Trustees.

The meeting materials are here – posted 2 days before the meeting. Not that the trustees read them. I haven’t either. If you see something, say something:

Board of Trustees
September 10, 2020 | 8:30 a.m. PT
Due to current orders regarding campus operations and social distancing, the meeting will be held remotely with a livestream broadcast and telephone conference options available for members of the public. That information is available at: https://trustees.uoregon.edu/meetings. Convene Public Meeting

  • Call to order and verification of a quorum
  • Approval of minutes from June 4, June 24 and August 27 full board meetings
  1. ASUO President and University Senate President Reports. Isaiah Boyd, ASUO President; Elliot Berkman, Professor of Psychology and University Senate President
  2. President and Provost Reports. Michael Schill, President; Patrick Phillips, Provost and Senior Vice President
  3. COVID-19 Impacts, Planning and Operations. Andre Le Duc, Associate Vice President and Chief Resilience Officer
  4. University Finances. Jamie Moffitt, Vice President for Finance and Administration and CFO
  5. Student Crisis Funds. Kris Winter, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students; Jim Brooks, Associate Vice President and Director of Financial Aid
    Meeting Recessed Until 1:00 p.m. PT
  6. Student Mental Health and Services. Deb Beck, Assistant Vice President and Executive Director of University Health Services; Shelly Kerr, Director of the University Counseling Center; Kris Winter, Associate Vice President and Dean of Students
  7. Student Success Initiatives Semi-Annual Report. Yvette Alex-Assensoh, Vice President for Equity and Inclusion; Sung-Woo Cho, Research Associate Professor, College of Education; Doneka Scott,
    Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Student Success
  8. UOPD Budget and Operations. Matt Carmichael, Chief of Police
  9. Presidential Evaluation Summary Report. Chuck Lillis, Chair
    Meeting Adjourned

Meanwhile the OSU Board has distributed meeting materials 9 days in advance of their meeting, and allows public comments before each agenda item:

Board Meeting – 09/17/2020

PUBLIC NOTICE: 

The Oregon State University Board of Trustees will meet on Thursday, Sept. 17, to consider the issuance of OSU revenue bonds and an adjustment to the Cordley Hall capital project budget. The board also will receive updates on the university’s COVID-19 planning and response efforts, budget and public safety program.

Given current COVID-19 guidance from the Governor’s Office, as well as university and county health officials, the meeting will be hosted through a remote conferencing service. The meeting is open to the public and will take place from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The meeting agenda, options for joining the meeting, and instructions for providing comment during the board meeting’s general comment period and in a testimony period held before the board votes on each action item are located on this webpage. Meeting materials will also be posted on this webpage as they are available.AGENDA: 

Print-friendly agenda – (pdf)

*A separate agenda item is provided for members of the public to comment on topics of interest.
**The public may also sign up to comment prior to Board action on any action item listed on the agenda.

Please note that items may be taken out of order.

  1. Call to Order/Roll/Declaration of a Quorum (Borkar)
  2. Public Comments*
  3. Opening Comments and Reports
  1. Chair’s Comments (Borkar)
  2. President’s Report (K. Alexander)
  3. COVID-19 Response and Planning (Feser, Larson, Dougherty)
  4. Consent Agenda (Borkar)
  5. Minutes of the August 14, 2020 Board Meeting
  6. Action Items*
  1. Issuance of OSU Revenue Bonds (BedientGreen, Hesano)
  2. Capital Project Change to Approved Budget: Cordley Hall (BedientOdenthal, Sann)
  3. Discussion Items
  1. Budget Update (Green, Bloomer)
  2. Public Safety Update (Green, C. Alexander, Odenthal)
  3. Adjournment

CAS Imagineering Dean appointed Interim Dean of Honor’s College

Info on Carol Stabile’s 2018 no-search no-consultation no-notice appointment as CAS Assoc Dean is here. She may well be an excellent choice and the CHC faculty may have been fully consulted and engaged in this new appointment. I don’t know, post a comment if you do.

Updated with pay: This promotion will, at least in theory, mean a substantial cost savings for UO. Stabile was paid $226,762 as CAS Assoc Dean Strat Initiatives, while the salary for the Clark Honor’s College Dean was just $186,281, as of Spring 2020. (Data here). 

Dear Colleagues,

I am extremely pleased to announce that I have named Carol Stabile, the associate dean for strategic initiatives for the College of Arts and Sciences, as the interim dean for the Clark Honors College. She will start in her new position on September 8, 2020.Carol has extensive, interdisciplinary history at UO. She will bring a strong and resourceful approach to guiding the CHC, and she will continue the work that former Dean Gabe Paquette and his team have worked on over the last two years.Since 2008, Carol has served as a professor in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, as well as the School of Journalism and Communication. She has been a faculty in residence at CHC for the last year, and has taught a variety of courses in the honors college since 2013. She is author or editor of five books, most recently The Broadcast 41: Women and the Anti-Communist Blacklist (MIT Press, 2018). She has taught courses on media history, feminist science fiction, and public writing. This winter, she will be teaching a Calderwood seminar in the CHC on writing for social justice.Her service record at UO is equally impressive and Carol has had an impact on the way we support our students and protect them from harm. Most notably, she co-chaired the University Senate’s Task Force to Address Sexual Assault and Survivor Support in 2014. One year later, she co-chaired the UO Committee on Sexual and Gender-based Violence. She was awarded the Wayne Westling Award for Distinguished University Service and Leadership by the University Senate for her work in that area. In 2016-17, she served on President Mike Schill’s Sexual Assault Advisory Committee.She also chaired the Student Success and Remote Education Task Force in April 2020, and was a member of the Student Success Working Group in the Division of Undergraduate Education and Student Success for the Office of the Provost during winter 2020.In CAS, Carol worked with all departments, the Division of Undergraduate Education and Student Success, and the University Career Center to open Tykeson Hall and implement a new advising model, including the creation of major and minor maps that combine information about academics with career readiness materials. In addition to her work on student success, she organized and led faculty writing circles, and worked with CAS leadership to plan and launch its Interdisciplinary Research Talks series.Before coming to the UO, she held academic positions at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Pittsburgh.Please join me in congratulating Carol. In the meantime, I will work with my team to formulate a plan on conducting a search to fill the position of CHC dean permanently. 

I hope you and your families are healthy and safe.

Patrick Phillips
Provost and Senior Vice President

 

UO to start rapid, daily testing for faculty, staff, students

Just kidding, it’s only for athletes and presumably the coaches. The Pac-12 press release:

SAN FRANCISCO – The Pac-12 Conference announced today that it has entered into an agreement with diagnostic test leader Quidel Corporation to implement up to daily testing for COVID-19 with student-athletes across all of its campuses for all close-contact sports. The agreement is a major step toward the safe return of sports competition in the Pac-12. The arrangement with Quidel will provide for frequent testing with rapid results, which had been one of the key concerns in the prior decision by the Pac-12 to postpone sport competition.  … Quidel’s Sofia 2 testing machines and tests are expected to be delivered to each of the Pac-12’s athletic departments by the end of September 2020.  Over the coming weeks, the Pac-12 plans to review this latest testing breakthrough with its sport planning committees and to evaluate the impact on return to competition scenarios. “This is a major step toward the safe resumption of Pac-12 sport competitions,” said Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott. “The availability of a reliable test that can be administered daily, with almost immediate results, addresses one of the key concerns that was expressed by our medical advisory committee, as well as by student-athletes, coaches and others. …

Why does Duck coach Mario Cristobal blab on for 10 minutes in UO’s “Virtual Visit for Prospective Students” video?

Athletic Director Rob Mullens, his well paid hangers-on, and those admin junketeers like to claim big-time sports is a big draw for students. But according to this 2013 data, it ranks down there with our urban farm and recycling program:

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And these are the answers from students who came to UO. I wonder how many good ones got driven away by UO’s big-time sports hype? From a 2013 survey by UO’s sustainability program, here. Thanks to a vigilant reader for the link.

In addition, faculty, staff, and students all agree that winning games should be UO’s lowest priority. Unfortunately they didn’t break out the results for the administrators that set UO’s athletic subsidies, but their revealed preference choices are pretty obvious.

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