Vin Lananna keeps job as UO Associate Athletic Director

He has, however, resigned as TrackTown President, right in the middle of planning for the 2021 IAAF Championships, and a federal investigation. Ken Goe has the scoop here:

Lananna led the successful bid for the 2021 World Outdoor Championships, which are scheduled to be at Hayward Field. The bid is under investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice, although no charges have been made. Lananna has insisted the bid was above board.

No word on whether of not Lananna will continue working for Tracktown’s “Oregon 21” subsidiary, or how this will affect the $10M Travel Oregon grant, which the Oregon DOJ has still not approved. More on Lananna’s complicated business arrangements from Diane Dietz in the RG, in 2015.

Hayward teardown vigil starts Tu at 2PM, DOJ still vetting Lananna deal

Update: A press release, explaining that city officials will be present to discuss the arborcide.

Contact:
Michael Carrigan 541-844-4677
Jim Watson 541-520-8942
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, Tuesday, June 19
Protesters To Gather at Hayward Field East Grandstand Tuesday

Community members will hold a vigil at 2:00 PM Tuesday to protest the imminent destruction of Hayward Field’s historic East Grandstand. The group, calling itself Save Hayward Magic, objects to the removal of all structures and trees on the Hayward site, and rejects the uncovered stadium proposed as a replacement. Responsibility for upgrading Hayward Field to meet the requirements of the 2021 World Games lies with a private company, Phit, LLC, an instrument of Nike founder Phil Knight.

Those picketing Tuesday say they want the East Grandstand saved because it provides important features not present in the completely replaced stadium first revealed by Phit LLC in April this year. They support the previous model for the site prepared by Nike designer Tinker Hatfield. That design included the East Grandstand in a plan to provide a flexible number of seats for different Hayward events.

The Save Hayward Magic group cites cover from rain, shading from sun, and fan interaction with the athletes as reasons to keep the historic structure. If the wooden structure is torn down over exaggerated fears of dryrot, they say they will continue to advocate for a stadium that includes the fan-friendly features. They say a replica of the 1925 design could be built at an affordable cost using materials already salvaged from the original.

The Save Hayward Magic group was formed by community members who attended meetings called by East Grandstand Supporters. The East Grandstand group has focused its efforts on presenting a legal challenge to the demolition. Save Hayward Magic wants the University of Oregon to pull back its authorization for Phit LLC to construct an enclosed stadium on the site of an existing University facility. They say financing problems with the Matt Knight arena, also managed by the Nike group, demonstrate how the new track venue could be forced to become a multi-purpose facility that draws significantly more traffic to the east campus area. Planning for the new facility bypassed both the City’s Neighborhood Associations and the University’s campus planning department.

Picketers will be at the Powell Plaza, 15th and Agate, starting at 2:00 PM. Later in the afternoon there will be a meeting at that site with Eugene officials to discuss appealing a permit decision that allows the Phit to cut the City-owned trees surrounding Hayward Field.

A well-informed source reports:

Save Hayward Magic Coalition will be organizing a vigil at Powell Plaza tomorrow–Tuesday, June 19–at 2pm.  They will be protesting the demolition of the East Grandstand, the process (read: lack of) leading to this point, and the wholly inappropriate involvement of corporate interests in the development of publicly owned University property.  We’re not sure exactly when actual bulldozer demo will start, but there are rumors it could start as early as tomorrow afternoon.

I’d like to believe that the new egofice and accessory schlong won’t cost UO’s academic side, but apparently we’re already on the hook for $1300 large, to rebuild the Hayward utility corridor to make it suitable for the athletic department’s needs:

Someone really needs to get the gift letter that spells out how much UO will have to pay for Phil Knight’s gift.

Meanwhile, the Oregon Tourism Commission’s contract with Vin Lananna’s Oregon 21 spinoff, to promote the notoriously corrupt IAAF’s 2021 championships, seems to be getting some special attention from the Oregon DOJ:

The deal was announced in December, but the DOJ still has questions. Presumably the FBI does too.

Hayward Field teardown public info meeting Th May 31st at 7PM, Agate Hall

UO will permanently close 15th, build plaza for Slusher’s Schlong. The RG has the story here,

With the usual PR flack BS:

Closing East 15th Avenue would result in the loss of 115 parking spaces used by students, employees and visitors, said UO spokeswoman Molly Blancett.

“Based on our most recent evaluations, we have a net surplus of parking spaces today and can absorb this change,” she said.

In other news, the formerly historic Bill Hayward now has an anti-teardown website, here.

Hayward Field teardown public info meeting Th May 31st at 7PM:

No, of course the UO Foundation is not hosting a public event to explain what’s going on, what with the FBI investigation of the IAAF bidding process still underway. This is from the teardown opponents:

Hayward Field East Grandstand Public Information Evening

FACILITATED BY: East Grandstand Supporters

EVENT: East Grandstand Public Information Evening PLACE: Agate Hall, 1787 Agate Street
DATE: Thursday, May 31, 2018
TIME: 7-8:30pm

TOPIC: Presentation, speakers, and interactive conversation about the Hayward Field renovation project and concerns about the East Grandstand, including discussion regarding public process, campus and neighborhood impacts, historic preservation, design, and potential impacts to the sport of track and field. The meeting is offered to provide the public with the information needed to better understand the scope and impact of this project, and how citizens can contribute to the public discussion.

SPEAKERS:
Peter John Thompson (former IAAF coach)
Robert Melnick, Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture UO
Don Peting, Professor Emeritus of Architecture and Historic Preservation UO James Tice, Professor of Architecture UO
with other notable legal, sport, and architectural contributors.

WHO ARE WE? East Grandstand Supporters advocate for the retention of the East Grandstand and its rehabilitation as the historic cornerstone of a fully renovated, state-of-the-art Hayward Field design. Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/haywardfield2021/

The university’s strategy seems to be to get the trees cut and the grandstand bulldozed quick, given the potential for indictments to cause people to think twice about what the hell is going on.

Video of UO’s initial pitch to the IAAF here:

And follow the Track and Field link below for more history and documents.

“We have taken great care to engage important stakeholders in the development of the plans,” Klinger says.

Just in case any UO students, faculty, community members, the UO Senate, ASUO, the Eugene City Council, the Mayor, the Campus Planning Committee, or most longtime Eugene track and field fans had any illusions about what JH and the UO Foundation think of their importance.

More in Meerah Powell’s Eugene Weekly story here:

… The demolition of Hayward Field’s East Grandstand was proposed to make room for a new stadium to house the 2021 World Outdoor Track and Field Championships — the same event under investigation by the Department of Justice for possible racketeering, money laundering and fraud charges, according to The New York Times.

There has been no update on the investigation since late January, when the NYT reported that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) had been of particular interest to the Department of Justice after awarding the championships to Eugene with no bidding process. …

Tom Bowerman asks how Slusher’s Schlong became a UO priority

4/23/2018: One of a series of op-eds and stories this week showing the disagreements over the $200M proposal to teardown and replace Hayward Field, and the secretive process Nike and UO are using to design and build it:

In the RG:

Bill Bowerman, my dad, contributed a lot to putting Hayward Field and Oregon on the track world’s map and in the heart of this community. In his retirement I asked him what he thought about the trajectory of college athletics. He said that if he had the choice between the trend toward sports professionalism or a low-key club-sport approach, he much preferred intramural athletics where sports fills a secondary role in a university education. My brother Jay affirms this recollection.

As the University of Oregon’s track coach, my dad was well known for developing local talent rather than chasing after world renowned stars. I believe he’d much prefer investing millions of dollars in scholarships for low-income Oregon kids to expanding Hayward Field to accommodate the extremely rare occasion when the stadium might seat 30,000.

… I’ve read an estimate of $200 million for the rebuild, but I suspect this is more than just the grandstand. But if true, that would pay the current annual tuition of 833 Oregon students in perpetuity if treated as a scholarship endowment. Of course this isn’t necessarily a zero sum game — but still, it’s a sobering consideration.

Doubtful, but perhaps it is time to call for our deeper and longer community priorities to rise to the top of decision-making.

Ken Goe in the Oregonian:

Designs for the new Hayward Field, presented yesterday in a ceremony at the track’s northwest corner, had a big wow factor.

It’s the details that were in short supply.

UO president Michael Schill, UO foundation president and CEO Paul Weinhold, and UO associate athletic director Vin Lananna struggled to answer basic questions about the exact number of permanent seats in the new stadium, and how many of the seats would be covered by the transparent roof at the top of the stadium.

It’s hard to see from the renderings how the stadium will more than double its seating capacity from somewhere between 12,000 and 13,000 to 30,000 simply by filling in around the open north end with temporary bleachers.

I’m sure there are answers to these questions. But the people who could provide them weren’t available.

Lead donors Phil and Penny Knight weren’t. Nor was anyone from the architectural firm SRG Partnership. Nor was anyone from Hoffman Construction, set to do the razing and reconstruction. Nor was semi-retired Nike troubleshooter Howard Slusher, the man who reportedly ramrodded the new design.

The process has been secretive from the start and excluded many people who have had a long emotional investment in track and field in this state and at the University of Oregon in particular.

That has led to a backlash from those who have spent a significant portion of their lives watching meets at what has been called historic Hayward Field. …

4/17/2018: UO unveils historic new Hayward Field, with weird fat blunt add-on

https://around.uoregon.edu/hayward?utm_source=ato04-17-18

Pres Schill says no to Campus Planning Committee review of Hayward Field grandstand teardown and new $200M Knight egofice

The Oregonian and the RG have had a series of stories about the secretive plans to tear down Hayward Field’s east grandstand as part of the effort to put a 30,000 seat stadium on Agate for the state-subsidized IAAF 2021 track championships.

http://www.oregonlive.com/trackandfield/index.ssf/2018/03/hayward_field_renovation_plan.html

The original design by architect and Nike shoe designer Tinker Hatfield, a former UO pole vaulter, has been scrapped.

Hatfield’s design, renderings of which the UO Foundation put on its website, attempted to incorporate changes required by the sport’s governing body, the International Association of Athletics Federations, while retaining the current feel of the stadium.

At some point, Hatfield was leveraged out of the project, according to sources familiar with the project who requested anonymity because they’re not authorized to speak publicly about it. Howard Slusher, longtime troubleshooter for Nike co-founder Phil Knight, took over as project manager. The architectural firm SRG Partnership was brought in to create an entirely different design.

http://www.oregonlive.com/trackandfield/index.ssf/2018/03/cost_estimates_continue_to_soa.html

— Word continues to filter out about the size and scale of the Hayward Field renovation project, the cost of which I’m hearing now tops $200 million.

That is a long way from an original estimate I saw of $60 million. And it’s probably in line with the apparent decision to tear down completely the existing stadium and replace it with something University of Oregon Foundation president and CEO Paul Weinhold calls “spectacular.”

There is some angst in Oregon’s track and field community about the loss of the historic east grandstand, and some concern about replacing a stadium that now has about 8,500 permanent seats with one that might have as many as 14,000.

The concern would be whether the new stadium will be too big and too grand for anything it will be called upon to stage after the 2021 World Outdoor Championships depart, and whether that will lead to the loss of synergy between fans and athletes popularly known as Hayward Magic.

http://www.oregonlive.com/trackandfield/index.ssf/2018/03/portland_track_editorializes_f.html

Portland Track, the organization that puts on the Portland Track Festival and Stumptown Twilight track meets, has jumped into the controversy with an editorial in support of the east grandstand.

Here is the editorial, which appears on the Portland Track website.

It reads, in part:

“Our favorite place to sit at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field is the 5,000 start line in the east grandstand.  The cheap seats. The atmosphere is loose, it’s where the athletes sit after they are done competing, and it’s where you need to be to take splits for the 5k and steeple.  As a bonus you can take in the 1,500m runners as they stride out before their races, you see the 200m sprinters preparing that explosive start, and the victory laps slow down a bit as the victors take the time for selfies and autographs for fans that crowd the front row. … “

And here’s last week’s RG story, by Austin Meek and Chris Hansen:

http://registerguard.com/rg/sports/36583495-81/hayward-field-project-clash-of-past-and-future.html.csp

The university says it has found that design — which includes a complete teardown of the East Grandstand, once slated for partial preservation — and will unveil plans to the public next month. But some stakeholders, including the son of legendary Oregon track coach Bill Bowerman, have expressed concern about what they see as a lack of transparency surrounding the project.

“I definitely support the idea of the renovation, but I worry (about) the direction it’s going right now, without public input, and without disclosure, and without the opportunity for stakeholders to participate and share in ownership of it,” Jay Bower­man said.

Good luck with that. Just a few weeks ago the UO administration was assuring the Senate that they wouldn’t even put astroturf next to the riverfront without a public process that included input from the Campus Planning Committee and a modification to the Campus Plan. But it turns out they are going to tear down the “historic” Hayward Field grandstand and replace it with a new and shiny $200M bauble without bothering with any of that.

From the CPC agenda for Friday, April 6, 2018 from 10am – 12pm in Johnson Hall Room 105. All meetings are open to the public. Public Records below, such as they are:

3. 15th Avenue Axis Improvements – Update

Background: The purpose of this agenda item is to provide the CPC with information on the plans for 15th Avenue Axis improvements which are proposed as part of the Hayward Field Project.

The CPC first discussed the Hayward Field Project at its December 10, 2015 meeting. Members supported the chair’s suggestion to provide recommendations to the president on behalf of the CPC about opportunities for this project to improve campus-wide linkages (refer to attached memorandum).

On June 5, 2016, the CPC Chair at the time received a memorandum from the Vice President for Finance and Administration thanking the CPC for its interest and advisory role regarding campus development, con rming the designation of the Hayward Field Project as a Track C Project per the Campus Plan and the President’s determination that formal review by the CPC would not be necessary.

Please also see the attached Campus Plan and Framework Vision Project recommendations for 15th Avenue Axis for more information.

Action: No formal action is requested.

Hayward Field - CPC Letter

 

http://uomatters.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/CampusPlan_15AveAxis_Opportunities.pdf

http://uomatters.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/CFOB_ProjectSummary.pdf

http://uomatters.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/UHCTC-CPC-Advance-Materials-03.30.2018.pdf

http://uomatters.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Mailing_04_06_18.pdf

Riverfront astroturf is not for PE classes or club sports. Is it part of the UO Foundation’s secret Tracktown 2021 plans?

UO wants the Eugene planning commission to give it the right to put 4 astro-turf playing fields with lights just south of the Willamette river. They claim this is for intramural Rugby and PE and Rec classes.

I don’t buy it. I don’t have the Rugby participation data, but it’s not New Zealand. For Fall 2017 UO had a total of 7 sections of PE classes that need playing fields such as flag football, ultimate, and soccer with a total of 166 students. (In comparison there were 27 sections of Yoga type classes). These are 1 credit sections that meet for 2 hours a week. That’s a grand total of 14 hours a week on the playing fields.

These classes are not exactly surging in popularity among UO students. In Fall 2012 there were 9 sections. And while PE and Rec already have 2 lit astroturf fields by the Rec Center, they have no sections scheduled at night.

So what is this really about? I’m guessing it’s part of the UO Foundation’s top secret planning for the 2021 Track & Field Championships.

Are feds questioning UO Foundation head Paul Weinhold over IAAF “side deals”?

2/20/2018: Austin Meek  has the latest on the Lananna and Tracktown in the RG here. No word yet on whether the feds are also interviewing the UO Foundation CEO Paul Weinhold, who also played a key role in the IAAF bidding, as reported by Diane Dietz in the RegisterGuard back in 2014:

The foundation’s financial guarantee to the IAAF set no upper limit on what the foundation would have been liable for if the Eugene event had turned into a money loser. …

Weinhold said the UO Foundation faced minimal risk in agreeing to cover meet losses because TrackTown USA’s budget was thoroughly vetted and reliable; Kitzhaber favored the legislation that would have provided millions in state support; and the foundation had confidential side deals meant to hold the foundation harmless, Weinhold said in the interview. Weinhold declined to disclose any specifics of those side deals.

“We do not believe we had any exposure, and we had agreements in place that eliminated our exposure. That should be enough for you,” he said. …

Side deals?

2/19/2018: Feds question Duck coach & Tracktown head Vin Lananna over 2021 IAAF Championships

Austin Meek in the RG:

USA Track & Field says it has placed Vin Lananna on temporary administrative leave after learning that Lananna and Eugene-based TrackTown USA were contacted “months ago” by federal authorities investigating corruption in the sport. …

No word yet on how the UO administration and the Foundation will handle this.

2/14/2018: Eugene loses three NCAA championship meets over Tracktown’s 2021 IAAF extravaganza

This is getting interesting. I wonder what the truth is. The Oregonian:

By closing its iconic track stadium for all of 2019, Oregon would void a three-year contract with the NCAA to host the NCAA Outdoor Championships in 2019, 2020 and 2021.

Because the Hayward Field tart-up for the 2021 IAAF meet will take it out of commission. Or because the NCAA doesn’t want to go down with Lananna?

In any case this certainly cuts into the rationale for Governor Kate Brown’s endorsement of $40M in public subsidies for the IAAF.

2/8/2018: USA Track and Field strips Duck coach Vin Lananna of his powers, as millions in public money change hands over 2021 IAAF championships

Before the legislature passed SB 270 and created the UO Board of Trustees, the Oregon Secretary of State’s Audit Division had authority for investigating this sort of sleaze. Now it’s all up to UO’s Internal Auditor Trisha Burnett (whose audits are apparently exempt from public records requests) – and of course the FBI, federal prosecutors, the IRS, the French government, and USA Track and Field.

And the Oregonian’s Jeff Manning, who has a stunning report here:

Vin Lananna’s rapid rise to the pinnacle of U.S. track and field has been stalled by a divisive fight on the sport’s national governing board over his business interests.

Less than a year after being elected president of USA Track & Field, Lananna was quietly stripped of some of his authority. The board specifically cited his leadership of several companies and nonprofits – including Eugene-based TrackTown USA — that routinely bid on contracts to host and organize track meets.

The board passed a two-page resolution in October that, among other things, forces the former University of Oregon track and field coach to recuse himself from any matter that involves his companies or their competitors.

Millions of dollars have changed hands between the governing body and Lananna’s numerous outside interests. Most recently, the association pledged $6 million to Oregon 21, the organizing committee of the 2021 track and field world championships in Eugene.

“Vin has been engaged in complete conflict of interest,” said Steve Miller, the track and field association’s chair. “The outcome of the vote is that he has to recuse himself from the vast majority of what he does as president of USATF. Your effectiveness as leader is greatly diminished when you can’t be in the room.” …

Will Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum follow up on this?

Meanwhile Lananna is still on the UO payroll, at 0.69 FTE:

Duck sports bring UO more of that national publicity money just can’t buy

In the NYT today:

…  The Justice Department is exploring possible racketeering, money laundering and honest services fraud charges related to two track and field world championship events and the business executives who have consulted on bids for various other elite competitions, according to one of the subpoenas, which was obtained by The New York Times.

The subpoenas, delivered in January, have solicited documents, testimony and financial records dating to 2013. Since that time, the United States has won bids to host two major sports events: the 2021 track and field world championships, in Eugene, Ore., and the 2028 Summer Olympics, in Los Angeles. The subpoena did not explicitly refer to the Los Angeles Olympic bid.

Of particular interest to the Justice Department, according to the subpoena, is the world governing body for track and field, known as the I.A.A.F. That federation awarded the sport’s 2019 world championships to Doha, Qatar, and the 2021 event to Eugene. …

Video of UO’s initial pitch to the IAAF here:

UO to replace Hayward Field with bigly 30k seat stadium for IAAF

A teardown seems a bit extreme. I wonder what sort of city approval this will require. Ken Goe has the report in the Oregonian:

An IAAF team has been in Portland and Eugene this week to discuss preparations for the 2021 World Outdoor Track & Field Championships.

The championships are more than three years away. But there are unresolved issues, such as repeated delays to required renovations of Hayward Field, and a reported FBI investigation into how the championships were awarded. …

The IAAF minimum capacity for a stadium hosting the world championships is 30,000.

Original plans called for an extensive renovation to begin immediately after the 2016 U.S. Olympic trials. It was expected to take two years with a pause late in the spring of 2017 to allow Hayward to stage the Prefontaine Classic, the Oregon state high school championships and the NCAA Outdoor Championships.

But the work has been delayed several times and has not yet begun. Sources say the original plan, which preserved the iconic east side of the stadium, has been scrapped.

The stadium project now is expected to be a complete teardown and rebuild under the direction of Howard Slusher, a longtime adviser to Nike co-founder Phil Knight. Knight is said to be a large contributor to the project. Slusher has supervised other building projects for Knight and Nike.

Paul Weinhold, president and CEO of the University of Oregon Foundation, said Wednesday he expects the project to begin this summer, and for the plans to become public early this spring.

“We’re doing it, and it’s going to be ready,” Weinhold said. …

Secretive UO Foundation’s $68M Hayward Field tart-up delayed again

update: And now it seems that the IAAF’s Lamine Diack, who gave the 2021 IAAF meet to Lananna’s TrackTown and UO, is implicated in a vote buying scheme over the award of the 2016 Olympics to Rio. I’m shocked:

Rio 2016 President Carlos Nuzman was taken into custody last Tuesday (September 5) under suspicion of involvement in a vote-buying scheme in the Brazilian city’s successful bid for the event.

The Brazilian has not been charged with anything but is suspected by prosecutors of being the main link between Arthur Cesar de Menezes Soares Filho, a businessman nicknamed “King Arthur”, and Diack, the Senegalese who was President of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) between 1999 and 2015.

9/11/2017: The Oregonian’s Ken Goe has a story here, but despite the $25M in state subsidies for the 2021 IAAF championship, no one will say anything substantive on the record. Perhaps that’s because Vin Lananna and Paul Weinhold want to hit up Governor Kate Brown and the taxpayers for more, and a construction start would make that harder?

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 12.38.31 PM

9/3/2015: UO Board of Trustees to approve glitzy Hayward Field makeover

Screen Shot 2015-09-03 at 3.37.27 PM

Christian Hill has the story in the RG here:

The University of Oregon is continuing to get all its Ducks in a row as it prepares for a major expansion and renovation of iconic Hayward Field.

The next step comes next Thursday, Sept. 10, when the UO Board’s Facilities and Finance Committee will be asked to give its blessing to an update of the historic stadium with flexibility to seat up to 30,000 fans.

More specifically, the committee will be asked to approve a resolution allowing UO President Michael Schill to enter into a lease with Hayward Field Enhancement LLC, a corporation created by the UO Foundation, for the duration of the renovation.

The corporation’s single person is not identified in a statement released by the foundation. A foundation spokeswoman did not immediately return a call seeking additional details. …

The renovation project is widely viewed as being put on a fast track — no pun intended — to prepare for the World Outdoor Track & Field Championships, which Hayward will host in 2021. It’s the first time that the world championships have ever been awarded to a venue in the United States. …

More on UO’s negotiations with the famously corrupt IAAF here – including current Oregon Governor Kate Brown on video, delivering Kitzhaber’s promise of $30M in state tax money. Phil Knight had given Kitz’s campaign $250K. Not a bad ROI.

Today’s NYT has a report on the IAAF’s new chairman Sebastian Coe, here. Coe is a Nike consultant, and people are already raising questions about that dual role:

“He is definitely the man for the job,” said Mary Wittenberg, the former chief of the New York City Marathon. “It’s really important that he seizes the moment to lead, to step above all potential conflict. Ditch the Nike and any other consulting arrangements.”

At a moment of such clear importance for his sport, the last thing Coe and track and field need is for his own message to get clouded.

UO Board Secretary Angela Wilhems kicked me and the RG’s Diane Dietz out of the Board meeting on UO’s bid to host the IAAF championships, and UO’s public records office is still hiding the documents from the Register Guard:

Screen Shot 2015-08-02 at 4.08.21 PM

To add to the secrecy, the UO Foundation is hiring Hoffman Construction to build this grandstand. The UO is currently suing Hoffman for $8.5M, alleging they did shoddy work on UO’s newest dorm, the Global Scholars Hall. UO Daily Emerald reporter Gordon Friedman, now at the Statesman Journal, reported on this back in May. UO has said the building is safe, but won’t release the inspection reports. (Thanks to a commenter for this reminder.)

BBC says FBI and IRS investigating IAAF et al over Tracktown bid

This is old news, but presumably the BBC thinks they might shake up some new sources with a reminder:

…Now, the BBC understands, the American authorities – including tax investigators at the IRS – are seeking to investigate if there has been any wrongdoing committed in the US, bringing to total number of agencies investigating the awarding of the championships to three….

More on the “blanchiment d’argent” timeline here, and video here: